Etymology
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electro- 

before vowels electr-, word-forming element meaning "electrical, electricity," Latinized form of Greek ēlektro-, combining form of ēlektron "amber" (see electric). As a stand-alone, formerly often short for electrotype, electroplate.

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pre-election (adj.)

also preelection, "occurring or given before a political election," 1893, from pre- "before" + election.

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electricity (n.)

1640s (Browne, from Gilbert's Modern Latin), from electric (q.v.) + -ity. Originally in reference to friction.

Electricity seems destined to play a most important part in the arts and industries. The question of its economical application to some purposes is still unsettled, but experiment has already proved that it will propel a street car better than a gas jet and give more light than a horse. [Ambrose Bierce, "The Cynic's Word Book," 1906]
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electromagnetic (adj.)

also electro-magnetic, "Pertaining to electromagnetics, or to the relation between electricity and magnetism; of the nature of electromagnetism," 1821; see electro- + magnetic.

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electioneer (v.)

"to try to influence an election by public speaking, solicitation of votes, etc.; to work for the success of a candidate or of a party in an election," 1760 (implied in verbal noun electioneering), from election, probably on model of auctioneer, as the verb engineer was not yet in use.

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electrification (n.)
1748, "state of being charged with electricity," noun of action from electrify.
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electron (n.)
coined 1891 by Irish physicist George J. Stoney (1826-1911) from electric + -on, as in ion (q.v.). Electron microscope (1932) translates German Elektronenmikroskop.
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photo-electric (adj.)

1863, "acting by the combination of light and electricity;" by 1880 as "producing light by means of electricity," from photo- + electric

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pre-election (n.)

1580s, "choice of one person or thing in preference to others," from pre- + election or else from Medieval Latin praeelectionem.

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