Etymology
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oval (adj.)

"having the longitudinal shape of an egg, elliptical," 1570s, from Modern Latin ovalis "egg-shaped" (source of French oval, 1540s), literally "of or pertaining to an egg," from Latin ovum "egg" (see ovum). The classical Latin word was ovatus (source of ovate (adj.)). Related: Ovalness (1727); ovality (1823).  Oval Office "office of the president of the United States in the White House" has been used since 1942 metonymically for "the presidency."

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albumen (n.)
1590s, "white of an egg," from Latin albumen (ovi) "white (of an egg)," literally "whiteness," from the neuter of albus "white" (see alb). The organic substance (which exists nearly pure in egg whites) so called from 1800, also known as albumin (1869, from French albumine).
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caviar (n.)

also caviare, "roe of certain large fish, salted and served as food," 1550s, from French caviar (16c.), from Italian caviaro (modern caviale) or Turkish khaviar, from Persian khaviyar, from khaya "egg" (from Middle Persian khayak "egg," from Old Iranian *qvyaka-, diminutive of *avya-, from PIE *ōwyo‑, *ōyyo‑ "egg," which is perhaps a derivative of the root *awi- "bird") + dar "bearing." The Russian name is ikra.

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ovary (n.)

"that part of the female animal in which eggs are generated," 1650s, from Modern Latin ovarium "ovary" (16c.), from Medieval Latin ovaria "the ovary of a bird" (13c.), from Latin ovum "egg," from PIE *ōwyo‑, *ōyyo‑ "egg," which is perhaps a derivative of the root *awi- "bird." In classical Latin, ovarius meant "egg-keeper," but Thomson ("Autumn") used ovarious (adj.) for "consisting of eggs."

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prairie-oyster (n.)

"salted and peppered raw egg, drunk in booze or vinegar," by 1878, American English, from prairie + oyster (in reference to the taste or the method of consuming it). Also called prairie-cocktail (1889). Prairie-oyster as "fried calf testicle," considered a delicacy, is by 1941.

PRAIRIE OYSTER. This simple but very nutritious drink may be taken by any person of the most delicate digestion, and has become one of the most popular delicacies since its introduction by me at Messrs. Spiers and Pond's. Its mode of preparation is very simple. Into a wine glass pat a new-laid egg ; add half a tea-spoonful of vinegar, dropping it gently down on the inside of the glass ; then drop on the yolk a little common salt, sufficient not to quite cover half the size of a threepenny-piece; pepper according to taste, The way to take this should be by placing the glass with the vinegar furthest from the mouth and swallow the contents. The vinegar being the last gives it more of an oyster-like flavour. [Leo Engel, "American & Other Drinks," London, 1878]
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ovoid (adj.)

"egg-shaped," by 1817, from Modern Latin ōvoīdēs, a hybrid from Latin ōvum "egg" (see ovum) + Greek -oeidēs "like" (see -oid). Related: Ovoidal.

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oviduct (n.)

"a passage for the egg from the ovary of an animal," 1757, from Modern Latin ōviductus (17c.), from ōvī ductus "channel of an egg." For the elements of this, see ovum and PIE root *deuk- "to lead." Related: Oviducal; oviductal.

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eggplant (n.)

also egg-plant, plant cultivated for its large oblong or ovate fruit, which is highly esteemed as a vegetable, 1763, from egg (n.) + plant (n.). Originally of the white variety. Compare aubergine.

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ovi- 

word-forming element meaning either "of or pertaining to an egg or eggs," from Latin ōvum "egg" (see ovum), or "of or pertaining to sheep," from Latin ovis "sheep" (see ewe).

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oval (n.)

1560s, "a plane figure in the general shape of the lengthwise outline of an egg," from French ovalle "oval figure," from noun use of Medieval Latin ovalis "of or pertaining to an egg," from Latin ovum "egg" (see ovary). The earliest use of the word in English (mid-15c.) was in reference to a Roman crown awarded as the symbol of an ovatio (see ovation).

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