Etymology
Advertisement
disinvestment (n.)

"reduction of investment," 1938, first recorded in writings of J.M. Keynes, from dis- + investment. The verb disinvest in the economic sense is a back-formation attested from 1961. Related: Disinvested; disinvesting.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
coexist (v.)

1670s, "exist at the same time as another," from co- + exist. Of political/economic systems, "to exist peaceably at the same time" (especially with reference to communism and the West) from 1931. Related: Coexisted; coexisting.

Related entries & more 
DOS 

"computer operating system using a disk storage device," 1967, acronym of disk operating system.

Related entries & more 
Mesoamerica (n.)

also Meso-America, cultural or economic region comprising central and southern Mexico and northern Central America, by 1948, from Spanish Mesoamérica (by 1943); see meso- "middle" + America. Related: Mesoamerican.

Related entries & more 
collectivism (n.)

1880, in socialist theory, "the principle of centralization of social and economic power in the people collectively" (opposed to individualism), from collective + -ism. Related: Collectivist (1882 as both noun and adjective); collectivization (1890).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
systematize (v.)
"make into a system," 1764, from French systématiser or a native formation from system (Greek stem systemat-) + -ize. Related: Systematized; systematizing.
Related entries & more 
drainage (n.)

1650s, "act or process of draining," from drain (v.) + -age. Sense of "the water carried off by a system of rivers" is by 1860. Meaning "system by means of which something is drained" is by 1878.

Related entries & more 
meter (n.2)

also metre, "fundamental unit of length of the metric system," originally intended to be one ten-millionth of the length of a quadrant of the meridian, 1797, from French mètre (18c.), from Greek metron "measure," from PIE root *me- (2) "to measure." Developed by French Academy of Sciences for system of weights and measures based on a decimal system originated 1670 by French clergyman Gabriel Mouton.

Related entries & more 
plutonomic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the science or study of wealth or riches," 1853, from Greek ploutos "wealth" (see Pluto) + ending from economic. Fell from currency 1870s, revived 1990s. Related: Plutonomy (1851); plutonomics (1991, a 19c. word for "the science of wealth and the natural laws governing its production and distribution" was plutology); plutonomist (1869).

Related entries & more 
VHS 
1982, initialism (acronym) of Video Home System.
Related entries & more 

Page 3