Etymology
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ballade (n.)
late 14c., an earlier borrowing of ballad (q.v.) with a specific metrical sense. Technically, a poem consisting of one or more triplets of seven- (later eight-) lined stanzas, each ending with the same line as the refrain, usually with an envoy. Popularized 19c. as a type of musical composition by Frédéric Chopin. Ballade royal, in which each line consists of ten syllables, is recorded from late 15c.
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apiece (adv.)

"for each" (thing, person, etc.), 1550s, a contraction of a pece (mid-15c.), originally of coins, objects for sale, etc.; see a (2) + piece (n.1).

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respectively (adv.)

mid-15c., respectiveli, "relatively" (a sense now obsolete); 1580s, "respectfully" (a sense now archaic); 1620s, "relatively to each of several singly," from respective (adj.) + -ly (2).

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plunk (v.)

1805, "to pluck a stringed instrument;" 1808 in sense of "drop down abruptly;" 1888 as "to hit, wound, shoot." Probably of independent imitative origin in each case. Related: Plunked; plunking.

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anti-node (n.)
also antinode, 1872, "point of a vibrating string where the amplitude is greatest," from anti- + node. Later applied to other wave systems; at the anti-node the two waves cancel each other out.
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backlash (n.)
1815, of machinery, "reaction of wheels on each other produced by an inconstant load," from back (adj.) + lash (n.) "a blow, stroke." In metaphoric sense, it is attested from 1929.
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quinary (adj.)

"pertaining to the number five; divided in a set of five," c. 1600, from Latin quinarius "consisting of five, containing five," from quint "five each" (from PIE root *penkwe- "five"). Related: Quinarian.

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cribbage (n.)

card game for two or four, 1620s, probably from crib "set of cards thrown from each player's hand" (which is of uncertain origin), though this word is later than the game name.

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American dream 

coined 1931 by James Truslow Adams (1878-1949), U.S. writer and popular historian (unrelated to the Massachusetts Adamses), in "Epic of America."

[The American Dream is] that dream of a land in which life should be better and richer and fuller for everyone, with opportunity for each according to ability or achievement. It is a difficult dream for the European upper classes to interpret adequately, and too many of us ourselves have grown weary and mistrustful of it. It is not a dream of motor cars and high wages merely, but a dream of social order in which each man and each woman shall be able to attain to the fullest stature of which they are innately capable, and be recognized by others for what they are, regardless of the fortuitous circumstances of birth or position. [Adams]

Others have used the term as they will.

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hobnob (v.)
1763, "to drink to each other," from hob and nob (1756) "to toast each other by turns, to buy alternate rounds of drinks," alteration of hab nab "to have or have not, hit or miss" (c. 1550), which is probably ultimately from Old English habban, nabban "have, not have," (that is, "to take or not take," used later as an invitation to drinking), with the negative particle ne- attached (from PIE root *ne- "not"), as was customary; see have. Modern sense of "socialize" is 1866. Related: Hobnobbed; hobnobbing.
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