Etymology
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inquiline (n.)
1640s, "a lodger," from Latin inquilinus "an inhabitant of a place not his own," from *incolinus, from incola "an inhabitant," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + colere "inhabit, dwell" (see colony). Zoological sense of "animal living in the abode of another, a commensal" is from 1865.
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Niflheim 
realm of the dead in Norse mythology, from Old Norse nifl- "mist; dark" (from Proto-Germanic *nibila-, from PIE root *nebh- "cloud") + heimr "residence, world" (from Proto-Germanic *haimaz, from PIE root *tkei- "to settle, dwell, be home").
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situate (v.)
early 15c., "to place in a particular state or condition," from Medieval Latin situatus, past participle of situare "to place, locate," from Latin situs "a place, position" (from PIE root *tkei- "to settle, dwell, be home"). Related: Situated; situating.
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Elysium (n.)

1590s, from Latin Elysium, from Greek Ēlysion (pedion) "Elysian field," abode of the blessed after death, where heroes and the virtuous dwell, which is of unknown origin, perhaps from Pre-Greek (a non-IE substrate Mediterranean language). Also used figuratively of a situation of complete happiness.

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inhabitant (n.)
"one who dwells in a place" (as distinguished from a visitor or transient), early 15c., from Anglo-French inhabitant, from Latin inhabitantem (nominative inhabitans), present participle of inhabitare "to dwell in" (see inhabit). Related: Inhabitants. As an adjective, also from early 15c.
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remanence (n.)

early 15c. (Chauliac), "remaining traces of a disease," from Old French remanence, remenence, related to remanoir "to stay, dwell, remain" (see remain (v.)). By 1660s in the general sense of "that which remains." The meaning "continuance, permanence" is by 1810 (Coleridge).

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antoecian (adj.)

"pertaining to the people dwelling on the opposite side of the earth," 1860, from antoeci (plural) "people dwelling on the opposite side of the earth" (1620s), a Latinized form of Greek antoikoi, literally "dwellers opposite," from anti "opposite" (see anti-) + oikein "to dwell" (from PIE root *weik- (1) "clan").

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harp (v.)
Old English hearpian "to play on a harp;" see harp (n.). Cognate with Middle Dutch, Dutch harpen, Middle High German harpfen, German harfen. Figurative sense of "talk overmuch" (about something), "dwell exclusively on one subject" first recorded mid-15c. Related: Harped; harping.
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bazaar (n.)
1580s, from Italian bazarra, ultimately from Persian bazar (Pahlavi vacar) "a market," from Old Iranian *vaha-carana "sale, traffic," from suffixed form of PIE root *wes- (1) "to buy, sell" (see venal) + PIE *kwoleno-, suffixed form of root *kwel- (1) "revolve, move round; sojourn, dwell."
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hamlet (n.)
early 14c., from Old French hamelet "small village," diminutive of hamel "village," itself a diminutive of ham "village," from Frankish *haim or some other Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *haimaz "home" (from PIE root *tkei- "to settle, dwell, be home"); for ending, see -let. Especially a village without a church.
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