Etymology
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subfusc (adj.)
"moderately dark, brownish," 1710, from Latin subfuscus, variant of suffuscus, from sub "under" (see sub-) + fuscus "dark, dusky" (see obfuscate). Related: Subfuscous "dusky."
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rugrat (n.)

also rug-rat, "baby, small child," by 1968; see rug + rat (n.).

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octopod 

1826 (adj.), "eight-footed or eight-armed;" 1835 (n.) "an eight-footed or eight-armed animal," especially an octopus, from Latinized form of Greek oktōpod-, stem of oktōpous (see octopus).

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ratty (adj.)

1856, "resembling a rat;" 1865, "full of rats;" 1867, "wretched, miserable, shabby," from rat (n.) + -y (2). An older word for "resembling a rat" is rattish (1680s).

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tetrapod (n.)
"four-footed animal, quadruped," 1826, from Modern Latin tetrapodus, from Greek tetrapous "four-footed," as a noun, "four-footed animal," from tetra- "four" (from PIE root *kwetwer- "four") + pous "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").
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quadruped (n.)

"a four-footed animal," especially "a four-footed mammal," 1640s, from French quadrupède (16c.), from Latin quadrupes (genitive quadrupedis) "four-footed, on all fours," also, as a noun, "a four-footed animal," from quadri- "four" (from PIE root *kwetwer- "four") + pes "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").

The adjective is attested from 1741, "four-footed, having four limbs fitted for sustaining the body and locomotion, habitually going on all fours." Related: Quadrupedal (1610s). In zoology, quadrumane (from Latin manus "hand") was "a four-handed animal," in reference to monkeys, apes, lemurs, etc.; attested by 1786.

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ratbag (n.)
also rat-bag, "unpleasant person," 1937, from rat (n.) + bag (n.).
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ratsbane (n.)

"rat poison, arsenic," 1520s; see rat (n.) + bane. Compare henbane, fleabane, wolfsbane.

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bandicoot (n.)
1789, a corruption of Telugu pandi-kokku, literally "pig-rat." Properly the Anglo-Indian name of a large and destructive type of Indian rat; applied from 1827 to a type of insectivorous Australian marsupial somewhat resembling it.
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rathskeller (n.)
1900, from German ratskeller, earlier rathskeller, "a cellar in a German town hall in which beer is sold," from rat "council" (from Proto-Germanic *redaz, from suffixed form of PIE root *re- "to reason, count") + keller "cellar" (see cellar (n.)). The German -h- inserted to avoid association with the word for "rat."
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