Etymology
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coprolite (n.)

"fossil dung, hard, roundish stony mass consisting of petrified fecal matter," 1829, from copro- + -lite, from French, for -lithe, from Greek lithos "stone" (see litho-). Related: Coprolitic.

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fetid (adj.)

early 15c., from Latin fetidus (commonly foetidus) "stinking," from fetere "have a bad smell, stink." This is perhaps connected with fimus "dung," or with fumus "smoke."

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merde (n.)

also merd, "dung, excrement," late 15c., from Old French merde "feces, excrement, dirt" (13c.), from Latin merda "dung, ordure, excrement." De Vaan compares Lithuanian smirdėti "to stink," Latvian smards "smell, odor," dialectal Russian smorod, Ukrainian smorid, genitive smorodu "stink," from a PIE *smerdh- "stench." Merd was naturalized in English through 17c., but subsequently lost and since mid-19c. (and especially since World War I) it has been generally treated as a French word when used in English.

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ordure (n.)

late 14c., "dung, excrement, feces; filth, dirt," from Old French ordure "filth, uncleanliness" (12c.), from ord, ort "filthy, dirty, foul," from Latin horridus "dreadful" (see horrid). Related: Ordurous.

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copremesis (n.)

in pathology, the vomiting of fecal matter, 1851, earlier in German, Modern Latin, from assimilated form of Greek kopros "dung" (see copro-) + emesis "a vomiting," from emein "to vomit" (see emetic). Related: Copremetic.

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poppycock (n.)

"trivial talk, nonsense," 1865, American English, probably from Dutch dialect pappekak, from Middle Dutch pappe "soft food" (see pap) + kak "dung," from Latin cacare "to excrete" (from PIE root *kakka- "to defecate").

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cowslip (n.)

popular name of several varieties of English wildflower, Old English cu-slyppe, apparently from cu "cow" (from PIE root *gwou- "ox, bull, cow") + slyppe "slop, slobber, dung" (from PIE root *sleubh- "to slide, slip"), which is its common habitat.

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coprolalia (n.)

"obsessive use of obscene language, either through mental illness or perversion," 1886, from French coprolalie, coined 1885 by de la Tourette, from copro- "dung, filth" + Greek lalia "talk, prattle, a speaking," from lalein "to speak, prattle," which is of echoic origin.

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coprophilia (n.)

"attraction, usually sexual, to defecation and feces," 1914, from copro- + -philia. Related: Coprophilic (1910, in Brill's translation of Freud). French coprophile is attested from 1903 in reference to fungi that grow on dung, and coprophilious is attested in English from 1953 in a fungal sense.

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dreck (n.)

"filth, trash," by 1922, from Yiddish drek (German dreck), from Middle High German drec, from Proto-Germanic *threkka (source also of Old English þreax "rubbish," Old Frisian threkk), perhaps connected to Greek skatos "dung," Latin stercus "excrement," from PIE root *(s)ker- "to cut" (see shear (v.)).

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