Etymology
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remorseful (adj.)

"characterized by remorse, burdened with a painful sense of guilt and penitence due to consciousness of guilt," 1590s, from remorse + -ful. Related: Remorsefully; remorsefulness.

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godly (adj.)
late 14c., from god + -ly (1). Perhaps earlier, but due to identical spelling in Middle English it is difficult to distinguish from goodly. Related: Godlily.
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disproportionate (adj.)

"out of proportion, unsymmetrical, lacking due proportion," 1550s; see dis- "not" + proportionate. Improportionate in same sense is from late 14c. Related: Disproportionately.

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saving (prep., conj.)

"except for; but for; minus," also "with due respect or consideration for" (one's honor, etc.), late 14c.; see save (prep.).

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nemesis 

1570s, Nemesis, "Greek goddess of vengeance, personification of divine wrath," from Greek nemesis "just indignation, righteous anger," literally "distribution" (of what is due), related to nemein "distribute, allot, apportion one's due," from PIE root *nem- "assign, allot; take." The notion is "divine allotment to everyone of his share of fortune, good or bad." With a lower-case -n-, in the sense of "retributive justice," attested from 1590s. General sense of "anything by which it seems one must be defeated" is by 1930.

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temperament (n.)

late 14c., "proportioned mixture of elements," from Latin temperamentum "proper mixture, a mixing in due proportion," from temperare "to mix in due proportion, modify, blend; restrain oneself" (see temper (v.)). In old medicine, it meant a combination of qualities (hot, cold, moist, dry) that determined the nature of an organism; thus also "a combination of the four humors (sanguine, choleric, phlegmatic, and melancholic) that made up a person's characteristic disposition." General sense of "habit of mind, natural disposition" is from 1821.

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rosewood (n.)

1650s, "close-grained wood of various Brazilian trees," from rose (n.1) + wood (n.). The name is due to the scent of some species when freshly cut. Later applied to similar woods from other sources.

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bed-sore (n.)
"gangrene caused by anemia due to continued pressure," 1833, from bed (n.) + sore (n.). A kind of ulcer liable to afflict persons long confined in bed and unable to change position.
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arrogation (n.)

"act of taking more than one's due," 1590s, from Latin arrogationem (nominative arrogatio) "a taking to oneself," noun of action from past-participle stem of arrogare "to claim for oneself" (see arrogate).

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mismatch (n.)

"a bad match, discrepancy, lack of correspondence," c. 1600, from mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + match (n.2). Sports sense of "unfair contest due to unequal abilities" is by 1954. Related: Mismatchment (1841).

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