Etymology
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desiccation (n.)

early 15c., desiccacioun, "a drying out," from Late Latin desiccationem (nominative desiccatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin desiccare "to make very dry," from de- "thoroughly" (see de-) + siccare "to dry" (see siccative). From 1540s as "act of making dry; state of being dry."

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desiccate (v.)

1570s (past-participle adjective desicatt is attested from early 15c.), transitive, "to dry, deprive of moisture," from Latin desiccatus, past participle of desiccare "to make very dry," from de- "thoroughly" (see de-) + siccare "to dry" (see siccative). Intransitive sense of "become dry" is from 1670s. Related: Desiccated; desiccating.

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scarious (adj.)

1806, in botany, "dry and shriveled," from Modern Latin scariosus "dry and shriveled," which is of obscure origin.

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sec (adj.)

of wine, "dry," 1863, an English use of French sec (10c.), from Latin siccus "dry" (also source of Italian secco); see siccative.

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*ters- 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to dry."

It forms all or part of: inter; Mediterranean; metatarsal; parterre; subterranean; tarsal; tarsus; Tartuffe; terra; terrace; terra-cotta; terrain; terran; terraqueous; terrarium; terrene; terrestrial; terrier; territory; thirst; toast; torrent; torrid; turmeric; tureen.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit tarsayati "dries up;" Avestan tarshu- "dry, solid;" Greek teresesthai "to become or be dry," tersainein "to make dry;" Latin torrere "dry up, parch," terra "earth, land;" Gothic þaursus "dry, barren," Old High German thurri, German dürr, Old English þyrre "dry;" Old English þurstig "thirsty."
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exsiccation (n.)

"act or operation of drying; evaporation of moisture," 1590s, from Late Latin exsiccationem "a drying up," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin exsiccare "dry up, make quite dry," from ex "out" (see ex-) + siccare "make dry" (see siccative).

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*as- 

also *es-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to burn, glow." 

It forms all or part of: ardent; ardor; area; arid; aridity; aril; arson; ash (n.1) "powdery remains of fire;" azalea; potash; potassium.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit asah "ashes, dust;" Hittite hat- "to dry up;" Greek azein "to dry up, parch," azaleos "dry;" Latin aridus "parched, dry," ārēre "to be dry," āra "altar, hearth;" Armenian azazem "I dry up;" Old English æsce "ash," Old High German asca, Gothic azgo "ashes." 

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xerophagy (n.)
"habit of living on dry food," especially as a form of fasting, 1650s, from xero- "dry" + -phagy "eating" (see -phagous).
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xero- 
before vowels, xer-, word-forming element meaning "dry," from Greek xero-, combining form of xeros "dry, withered" (see xerasia).
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conterraneous (adj.)

"of the same earth or world," 1640s, from Latin conterraneus, from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + terra "earth, land" (literally "dry land," from PIE root *ters- "to dry"). 

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