Etymology
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dewdrop (n.)

also dew-drop, c. 1200, deawes drope, "a drop of dew;" see dew + drop (n.). Compare German Thautropfen, Danish dugdraabe.

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raindrop (n.)

"a drop of rain," Middle English rein-drope, from Old English rendropa; see rain (n.) + drop (n.).

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pruinose (adj.)

"covered with a bloom or powder so as to appear to be frosted," of fruits, etc., by 1818, from Latin pruinosus "frosted," from pruina "hoar-frost," from PIE *prus-uo- "sprinkling, drop" (source also of Sanskrit pruṣva "drop of dew, cool drop."

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droop (v.)

c. 1300, droupen, "to sink or hang down; be downcast or sad," from Old Norse drupa "to drop, sink, hang (the head)," related to Old English dropian "to drop" (see drop (v.)). Related: Drooped; drooping. As a noun, "act of drooping," from 1640s.

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instill (v.)
also instil, early 15c., "to introduce (liquid, feelings, etc.) little by little," from Latin instillare "put in by drops; to drop, trickle," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + stilla "a drop" (see distill). Related: Instilled; instiller; instilling.
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mortuary (adj.)

1510s, "of or pertaining to the burial of the dead," from Late Latin mortuarius "of the dead," from Latin mortuus "dead" (see mortuary (n.)).

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snowdrop (n.)
early flower, 1660s, from snow (n.) + drop (n.).
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instillation (n.)
1540s, from Latin instillationem (nominative instillatio) "a dropping in," noun of action from past participle stem of instillare "put in by drops; to drop, trickle," from in- "in" (from PIE root *en "in") + stilla "a drop" (see distill).
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deaden (v.)

1660s "deprive of or diminish (some quality), to make dead (figuratively)," from dead (adj.) + -en (1). Earlier the verb was simply dead. Related: Deadened; deadening.

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peppermint (n.)

herb native to Europe, naturalized in the U.S., noted for its aromatic, pungent oil, 1690s, from pepper (n.) + mint (n.1). Compare Dutch pepermunt, German Pfeffermünze. As "candy drop flavored with peppermint" by 1829 (peppermint-drop is by 1799).

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