Etymology
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cady (n.)
"hat, cap," 1846, British English, of unknown origin.
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undress (n.)
"state of partial or incomplete dress," 1680s, from undress (v.). Meaning "ordinary dress" is from 1748.
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hatter (n.)
late 14c., from hat + -er (1). Their association with madness dates to at least 1837.
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cockade (n.)

"clasp, button, etc. used to secure the cock of a hat," hence "any knot or badge worn on a hat," especially as a sign of political adherence, 1709, earlier cockard (1650s), from French cocarde (16c.), fem. of cocard (Old French cocart) "foolishly proud, cocky," as a noun, "idiot, fool;" an allusive extension from coq (see cock (n.1)).

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bloomers (n.)

1851, named for U.S. feminist reformer Amelia Jenks Bloomer (1818-1894), who promoted them. The surname is attested from c. 1200, said to mean "iron-worker," from Old English bloma (see bloom (n.2)). The original Bloomer costume was a short skirt, loose trousers buttoned round the ankle, and a broad-brimmed, low-crowned hat.

The failure of the Bloomer dress seems to have arisen from the mixed character it assumed, and the unpleasant confusion of ideas it occasioned. It partook of the man's the woman's and the child's. A bold assumption of a full male dress, as by Madame Dudevant and Miss Weber, and such as is worn at pleasure by ladies, traveling or on excursions, anywhere on the continent of Europe, would have had a much better chance of tolerance and success. ["The Illustrated Manners Book, A Manual of Good Behavior and Polite Accomplishment," New York, 1855]
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dressmaker (n.)

also dress-maker, "one whose occupation is the making of articles of feminine attire," 1803, from dress (n.) + maker.

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trilby (n.)
type of hat, 1897, from name of Trilby O'Ferrall, eponymous heroine of the novel by George du Maurier (1834-1896), published in 1894. In the stage version of the novel, the character wore this type of soft felt hat. In plural, also slang for "feet" (1895), in reference to the eroticism attached in the novel to the heroine's bare feet. Related: Trilbies.
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broad-brim (adj.)
as a style of hat, 1680s, from broad (adj.) + brim (n.). Broad-brimmed) in 18c.-19c. suggested "Quaker male," from their characteristic attire.
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beanie (n.)
"small, close-fitting hat," 1940, from bean (n.) in the slang sense of "head" + -ie.
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toque (n.)

kind of round hat, c. 1500, from French toque (15c.), from Spanish toca "woman's headdress," possibly from Arabic *taqa, from Old Persian taq "veil, shawl."

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