Etymology
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put-down (n.)

"insult, snub," 1962, from verbal phrase put down "to snub," attested from c. 1400 in this sense, earlier (c. 1300) "to lower, let down," also (mid-14c.) "to throw down, reject;" see put (v.) + down (adv.). To put (something) down "end by force or authority" (a rebellion, etc.) is from mid-14c.  Compare set-down "a rebuff, a scolding" (1780).

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low-down (adj.)
also low down, lowdown, "vulgar, far down the social scale," 1888, from low (adj.) + down (adv.). Earlier it had meant "humble" (1540s). As a noun, 1915, from the adjective, American English. Low-downer was late 19c. American English colloquial for "poor white; rude, mean person."
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run-down (adj.)

1866, of persons, "to have the health or strength reduced," from the verbal phrase; see run (v.) + down (adv.). From 1896 of places, "dilapidated, shabby, seedy;" by 1894 of clocks, etc., "completely unwound." The earliest sense is "oppressed" (1680s). Compare rundown (n.).

The verbal phrase run down as "have the motive power exhausted" (of clocks, etc.) is by 1761; of persons, etc., "become weak or exhausted," by 1828. To run (something or someone) down "disparage, abuse" is by 1660s. 

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shake-down (n.)

also shakedown, 1730, "impromptu bed made upon loose straw," from the verbal phrase; see shake (v.) + down (adv.). The verbal phrase shake down is attested from late 14c. as "shake into place, compact by shaking" also "cause to totter and fall." The meaning "forced contribution" (1902) is from the verbal phrase in a slang sense of "blackmail, extort" (1872). Meaning "a thorough search" is from 1914; perhaps from the notion of measuring corn; the verbal sense of "to frisk or search" is by 1915 in police reporting.

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downer (n.)

1966, "barbiturate;" 1970 as "depressing person;" agent noun from down (v.).

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downy (adj.)

"covered with down; resembling down," 1570s, from down (n.1) + -y (2). Related: Downiness.

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downpour (n.)

"heavy or continuous shower," 1811, from the verbal phrase, from down (adv.) + pour (v.).

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downrange (adv.)

"along the course of a missile, spacecraft, etc.," 1952, from down (adv.) + range (n.).

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downside (n.)

also down side, 1680s, "underside;" see down (adv.) + side (n.). Meaning "drawback, negative aspect" is attested by 1995.

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downturn (n.)

"a decline," 1926 in an economic sense, from the prepositional phrase; see down (adv.) + turn (n.).

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