Etymology
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jamb (n.)
side-piece of an opening of a door, window, etc., early 14c., from Old French jambe "pier, side post of a door," originally "a leg, shank" (12c.), from Late Latin gamba "leg, (horse's) hock" (see gambol).
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slot (v.2)
1560s, "to bolt a door," from slot (n.2). Related: Slotted; slotting.
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hatchback 
type of rear door of an automobile, 1970, from hatch (n.) + back (n.).
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thyroid (adj.)

1690s (in reference to both the cartilage and the gland), from Greek thyreoeides "shield-shaped" (in khondrosthyreoeides "shield-shaped cartilage," used by Galen to describe the "Adam's apple" in the throat), from thyreos "oblong, door-shaped shield" (from thyra "door," from PIE root *dhwer- "door, doorway") + -eides "form, shape" (see -oid). The noun, short for thyroid gland, is recorded from 1849.

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embrasure (n.)
"enlargement of the interior aperture of a door or window," 1702, from French embrasure (16c.), from Old French embraser "to cut at a slant, make a groove or furrow in a door or window," from assimilated form of en- "in" (see en- (1)) + braser "to cut at a slant."
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latch (n.)
"device for catching and retaining," especially "a fastening for a door," late 13c., probably from latch (v.).
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shop-bell (n.)

"small bell so hung as to ring notice of the opening of a shop door," 1853, from shop (n.) + bell (n.).

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porter (n.2)

["doorkeeper, janitor"] mid-13c. (late 12c. as a surname), "one who has charge of a door or gate; one who guards the gate of a bridge," from Anglo-French portour, Old French portier "gatekeeper" (12c.), from Late Latin portarius "gatekeeper," from Latin porta "city gate, gate; door, entrance," from PIE root *per- (2) "to lead, pass over."

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haggaday (n.)
mid-14c., "a kind of door latch," and said to be still the name for rings for raising thumb-latches in the north of England. It appears to be what it looks like: what you say when you open the door ("have good day," as in the 1414 record of them as hafgooddays).
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usher (n.)
late 13c., "servant who has charge of doors and admits people to a chamber, hall, etc.," from Anglo-French usser (12c.), Old French ussier, uissier "porter, doorman," from Vulgar Latin *ustiarius "doorkeeper," variant of Latin ostiarius "door-keeper," from ostium "door, entrance," from os "mouth," from PIE *os- "mouth" (see oral). Fem. form usherette is attested from 1913, American English.
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