Etymology
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opioid (n.)

1957, from opium + -oid. Originally not clearly distinguished from opiate, but now generally "chemical product that works the same as an opiate but does not occur naturally."

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snowfall (n.)
1821, "fall of snow," especially a quiet one (as distinguished from a snowstorm), from snow (n.) + storm (n.). From 1875 as "amount that falls at a place in a given time."
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bell-bottoms (n.)
type of trousers, 1882, from bell (n.) + bottom (n.). Distinguished in the late 1960s from flares by the shape of the expanded part (flares straight, bell-bottoms of inverted cup-shape, like a bell).
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Rabelaisian (adj.)

1775, "of or pertaining to the writings or style of 16c. French author François Rabelais," whose writings "are distinguished by exuberance of imagination and language combined with extravagance and coarseness of humor and satire." [OED]

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Isis 
Egyptian goddess, from Greek Isis, from Egyptian Hes, female deity identified by the Greeks with Io. She is distinguished in visual representations by the solar disc and cow horns on her head.
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hereditament (n.)
"inherited property, anything that can be inherited" (as distinguished from property the ownership of which terminates with the death of the owner), mid-15c., from Medieval Latin hereditamentum, from Latin hereditatem (see heredity).
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co-belligerent (n.)

"one who is mutually at war" (as distinguished from an ally), 1813, a word from the Napoleonic wars, from co- + belligerent. As an adjective, "carrying on war in conjunction with another power," from 1828.

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excellent (adj.)

"unexcelled, distinguished for superior merit of any kind, of surpassing character or quality, uncommonly valuable for any reason, remarkably good," mid-14c., from Old French excellent "outstanding, excellent," from Latin excellentem (nominative excellens) "towering, prominent, distinguished, superior, surpassing," present participle of excellere "surpass, be superior; to rise, be eminent," from ex "out from" (see ex-) + -cellere "rise high, tower," related to celsus "high, lofty, great," from PIE root *kel- (2) "to be prominent; hill." Related: Excellently.

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still (n.2)
c. 1200, "a calm," from still (adj.). Sense of "quietness, the silent part" is from c. 1600 (in still of the night). Meaning "a photograph" (as distinguished from a motion picture) is attested from 1916.
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protestant (adj.)

"protesting, making a protest," by 1844, from French or directly from Latin protestantem, present participle of protestari "declare publicly, testify, protest" (see protest (n.)). Usually distinguished by pronunciation, if it is used at all, from Protestant.

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