Etymology
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flaunt (v.)
1560s, "to display oneself in flashy clothes," of unknown origin. Perhaps a variant of flout or vaunt. Perhaps from Scandinavian, where the nearest form seems to be Swedish dialectal flankt "loosely, flutteringly," from flakka "to waver" (related to flag (v.1)). It looks French, but it corresponds to no known French word. Transitive sense, "flourish (something), show off, make an ostentatious or brazen display of" is from 1827. Related: Flaunted; flaunting; Flauntingly.
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exhibitor (n.)

1650s (as exhibiter, 1590s), from Late Latin exhibitor, agent noun from past-participle stem of Latin exhibere "to display, show" (see exhibition).

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LCD 
1973, initialism (acronym) from liquid crystal display, which is attested from 1968, from liquid crystal, a translation of German flüssiger krystall (1890).
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objet (n.)

"an object on display as an ornament," 1857, from French objet (14c.), especially in objet d'art, from Latin obiectus (see object (n.)). In English, objet d'art is attested from 1865. 

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bravura (n.)
1788, "a spirited, florid piece of music requiring great skill in the performer," from Italian bravura "bravery, spirit" (see brave (adj.)). Sense of "display of brilliancy, dash" is from 1813.
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refresh (n.)

1590s, "act of resupplying, refreshment," from refresh (v.). Modern computer sense of "an act or the process of renewing data or display" is by 1967.

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Pecksniffian (adj.)

"characterized by an ostentatious hypocritical display of benevolence or high principle," 1851, after Mr. Pecksniff, character in Dickens' "Martin Chuzzlewit" (1844).

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unveil (v.)
1590s, in reference to sight, "to make clear," from un- (2) "opposite of" + veil (v.). Sense of "to display or reveal" (something) is from 1650s. Related: Unveiled; unveiling.
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exhibit (n.)
1620s, "document or object produced as evidence in court," from Latin exhibitum, noun use of neuter past participle of exhibere "to display, show," "to show, display, present," literally "hold out, hold forth," from ex "out" (see ex-) + habere "to hold" (from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive"). Meaning "object displayed in a fair, museum, etc." is from 1862. Transferred use of exhibit A "important piece of evidence" is by 1906.
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scoreboard (n.)

also score-board, 1826, "blackboard in a tavern on which debts are chalked," from score (n.) + board (n.1). By 1884 as a display of the tally on a sports contest or game.

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