Etymology
Advertisement
No results were found for disciple. Showing results for discipline.
flagellant (n.)
late 16c., "one who whips or scourges himself for religious discipline," from Latin flagellantem (nominative flagellans), present participle of flagellare "to scourge, lash" (see flagellum). There were notable outbreaks of it in 1260 and 1340s. As an adjective, "given to flagellation," 1880.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Schwenkfeldian (n.)

1560s, from Kasper Schwenkfeld (1490-1561), Silesian Protestant mystic who founded the sect. Their original name for themselves was Confessors of the Glory of Christ. Schwenkfelder (n.) is attested from 1882.

They select their ministers by lot, maintain a strict church discipline, and do not observe the sacraments. They are now found chiefly in Pennsylvania. [Century Dictionary, 1890]
Related entries & more 
fraternize (v.)

1610s, "to sympathize as brothers," from French fraterniser, from Medieval Latin fraternizare, from Latin fraternus "brotherly" (see fraternity). Military sense of "cultivate friendship with enemy troops" is from 1897 (used in World War I with reference to the Christmas Truce). Used oddly in World War II armed forces jargon to mean "have sex with women from enemy countries" as a violation of military discipline.

A piece of frat, Wren-language for any attractive young woman — ex-enemy — in occupied territory. [John Irving, "Royal Navalese," 1946]

Related: Fraternized; fraternizing.

Related entries & more 
praxis (n.)

1580s, "practice or discipline for a specific purpose," from Medieval Latin praxis "practice, exercise, action" (mid-13c., opposite of theory), from Greek praxis "practice, action, doing," from stem of prassein, prattein "to do, to act" (see practical). From 1610s as "a collection of examples for practice." In 20c. given a particular sense in Marxist jargon.

Related entries & more 
chasten (v.)

"inflict trouble or pain on for the purpose of correction," 1520s, with -en (1) + the word it replaced, obsolete verb chaste "to correct (someone's) behavior" (Middle English chastien, c. 1200), from Old French chastiier "to punish" (see chastise). Now chiefly in reference to moral discipline, divine rather than corporal punishment. Related: Chastened; chastening.

Whom the Lord loveth he chasteneth [Hebrews xii.6]
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
train (v.)
"to discipline, teach, bring to a desired state by means of instruction," 1540s, probably from earlier sense of "draw out and manipulate in order to bring to a desired form" (late 14c.), specifically of the growth of branches, vines, etc. from mid-15c.; from train (n.). Sense of "point or aim" (a firearm, etc.) is from 1841. Sense of "fit oneself for a performance by a regimen or exercise" is from 1832. The meaning "to travel by railway" is recorded from 1856. Related: Trained; training.
Related entries & more 
thews (n.)
Old English þeawes "customs, habit, manners; morals, conduct, disposition, personal qualities," plural of þeaw "habit, custom," from Proto-Germanic *thawaz (source also of Old Saxon thau "usage, custom, habit," Old High German thau "discipline"). According to OED, with no certain cognates outside West Germanic and of unknown origin. Meaning "bodily powers or parts indicating strength, good physique" is attested from 1560s, from notion of "good qualities." Acquired a sense of "muscular development" when it was revived by Scott (1818).
Related entries & more 
undomesticated (adj.)

1787, of women, "unsuited to home life," 1813, of animals, "not brought under control of humans," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of domesticate (v.). Undomestic "not caring for home life" is recorded from 1754.

It is undomesticated women that poison the sources of our sweetest comforts. It is undomesticated women that have houses without any order or arrangements, servants without discipline, and children without instruction; ["Reflections on the Dangers and Insufficiency of Boarding Schools, considered as a mode of Female Education," 1787] 
Related entries & more 
provost (n.)

Old English profost, "local governor, representative of a king in a country or district," reinforced by Old French cognate provost, both from Late Latin propositus, from Latin propositus/praepositus "a chief, prefect" (source of Old Provençal probost, Old High German probost, German Propst), literally "placed before, in charge of," past participle of praeponere "put before" (see preposition).

Provost marshal, "military officer who acts as head of police in a district, town, camp, etc., to preserve order and punish offenses against military discipline," is attested from 1510s.

Related entries & more 
rigor (n.)

late 14c., rigour, "harshness, severity in dealing with persons; force; cruelty," from Old French rigor "strength, hardness" (13c., Modern French rigueur), from Latin rigorem (nominative rigor) "numbness, stiffness, hardness, firmness; roughness, rudeness," from rigēre "be stiff" (from PIE root *reig- "stretch; be stretched; be stiff").

Also, in medieval medicine, "a sudden chill" (c. 1400). From early 15c. as "exactness, strictness without indulgence" (of discipline, the law, etc.). Compare rigidity. Rigorism "rigidity in principles or practice" (originally religious) is from 1704. Rigidist is by 1716.

Related entries & more 

Page 3