Etymology
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machination (n.)

late 15c., machinacion, "a plotting, an intrigue," from Old French machinacion "plot, conspiracy, scheming, intrigue" and directly from Latin machinationem (nominative machinatio) "device, contrivance, machination," noun of action from past-participle stem of machinari "to contrive skillfully, to design; to scheme, to plot," from machina "machine, engine; device trick" (see machine (n.)). Related: Machinations.

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photometer (n.)

"instrument used to measure the intensity of light," 1778, from photo- "light" + -meter "device for measuring." Related: Photometric; photometry (1760).

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contraceptive 

1891 (n.) "a contraceptive device or drug;" 1915 (adj.) "pertaining to contraception; preventing conception," from stem of contraception + -ive.

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fuse (n.)
"combustible cord or tube for lighting an explosive device," also fuze, 1640s, from Italian fuso, literally "spindle" (the ignition device so called for its shape, because the originals were long, thin tubes filled with gunpowder), from Latin fusus "a spindle," which is of uncertain origin. Influenced by French cognate fusée "spindleful of hemp fiber," and obsolete English fusee "musket fired by a fuse," which is from French. Meaning "device that breaks an electrical circuit" is first recorded 1884, so named for its shape, but erroneously attributed to fuse (v.) because it melts.
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camera obscura (n.)
1725, "a darkened room;" c. 1730, "a device for project pictures;" see camera.
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pulser (n.)

by 1940, "device that gives electrical pulses," agent noun from pulse (v.).

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door-stop (n.)

"device placed behind a door to prevent it from being opened too widely," 1859, from door + stop (n.).

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incinerator (n.)
"device for waste disposal by burning," 1872, from incinerate + Latinate agent noun suffix -or.
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contraption (n.)

a slighting word for "a device, a contrivance," 1825, western England dialect, origin obscure, perhaps from con(trive) + trap, or deception.

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DOS 

"computer operating system using a disk storage device," 1967, acronym of disk operating system.

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