Etymology
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bulgur (n.)
cereal food, 1934, from Turkish bulghur, bulgar.
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locavore (n.)
one who eats only locally grown or raised food, by 2001, from local (adj.) + ending abstracted from carnivore, etc., ultimately from Latin vorare "to devour" (from PIE root *gwora- "food, devouring").
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foodoholic (n.)
1965, formed irregularly from food + -aholic.
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boarding (n.)
1530s, "supplying of meals, food and lodging," from board (n.1) in its extended sense of "food" (via notion of "table"). Boarding-school is from 1670s; boarding-house attested from 1728.
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alimentary (adj.)
"pertaining to nutrition," 1610s, from Medieval Latin alimentarius "pertaining to food," from Latin alimentum "nourishment, food," from alere "to nourish, rear, support, maintain," from PIE root *al- (2) "to grow, nourish."
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malnutrition (n.)

"defect of sustenance from imperfect assimilation of food," 1843, from mal- + nutrition.

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pabulum (n.)

"food" for anything, "food" in its widest sense, "that which nourishes an animal or vegetable," 1670s, from Latin pabulum "fodder, food, nourishment," from PIE root *pa- "to feed" + instrumentive suffix *-dhlom. Related Pabular; pabulary; pabulous.

Pablum (1932), derived from this, is a trademark (Mead Johnson & Co.) for a soft, bland cereal used as a food for infants and weak and invalid persons, hence its figurative use (attested from 1970, first by U.S. Vice President Spiro Agnew) in reference to "mushy" political prose.

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feed (v.)
Old English fedan "nourish, give food to, sustain, foster" (transitive), from Proto-Germanic *fodjan (source also of Old Saxon fodjan, Old Frisian feda, Dutch voeden, Old High German fuotan, Old Norse foeða, Gothic fodjan "to feed"), from PIE root *pa- "to feed." Intransitive sense "take food, eat" is from late 14c. Meaning "to supply to as food" is from 1818.
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malabsorption (n.)

"imperfect absorption (of food, by the body)," 1879, from mal- + absorption.

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