Etymology
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extremely (adv.)
1530s, from extreme + -ly (2). Originally "with great severity," later more loosely, "in extreme degree" (1570s).
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divinely (adv.)

early 15c., "in a God-like manner;" 1580s, "excellently, in the supreme degree;" from divine (adj.) + -ly (2).

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sura (n.)
chapter of the Quran, 1610s, from Arabic surah, literally "step, degree." Compare Hebrew shurah "row, line."
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enhancement (n.)

"increase in degree or extent, augmentation, act or state of being enhanced," 1570s, from enhance + -ment.

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titration (n.)
in chemistry, "the establishment of a standard strength or degree of concentration of a solution," 1864, noun of action from titrate (v.).
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associate (n.)
1530s, "a partner in interest or business," from associate (adj.). Meaning "one admitted to a subordinate degree of membership" is from 1812.
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out-and-out 

c. 1300 as an adverbial phrase, "completely, thoroughly, to the utmost degree," from out (adv.). Adjective usage is attested by 1813.

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horniness (n.)
1885, "degree to which something is or resembles horn;" by 1957 in the "state of advanced sexual excitement" sense; from horny + -ness.
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B.T.U. 

1889 as an abbreviation of British Thermal Unit (1862), a commercial unit of electrical energy (the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit); the French Thermal Unit is the amount of heat required to raise 1 kilogram of water 1 degree centigrade. Also from 1889 as an abbreviation of Board of Trade Unit, in electicity "1,000 watt hours."

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baccalaureate (n.)
1620s, "university degree of a bachelor," from Modern Latin baccalaureatus, from baccalaureus "student with the first degree," alteration of Medieval Latin baccalarius "one who has attained the lowest degree in a university, advanced student lecturing under his master's supervision but not yet having personal licence" (altered by folk etymology or word-play, as if from bacca lauri "laurel berry," laurels being awarded for academic success).

The Medieval Latin word is of uncertain origin; perhaps ultimately from Latin baculum "staff" (see bacillus), which the young student might carry. Or it might be a re-Latinization of bachelor in its academic sense.

In modern U.S. usage, baccalaureate usually is short for baccalaureate sermon (1864), a religious farewell address to a graduating class at an American college, from the adjectival sense "pertaining to the university degree of bachelor."
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