Etymology
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AIDS (n.)

1982, acronym formed from acquired immune deficiency syndrome. AIDS cocktail attested by 1997, the thing itself said to have been in use from 1995.

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insufficiency (n.)

1520s, from Old French insufficience and directly from Late Latin insufficientia "insufficience," abstract noun from insufficientem "insufficient" (see insufficient). Insufficience "deficiency" is from early 15c.

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zoonosis (n.)

"disease communicated to humans by animals," plural zoonoses, 1876, from Greek zōon "animal" (see zoo-) + nosos "disease" (see noso-).

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osteopathy (n.)

1857, "disease of the bones," from Greek osteon "bone" (from PIE root *ost- "bone") + -pathy "disorder, disease," from Greek -patheia, combining form of pathos "suffering, disease, feeling" (from PIE root *kwent(h)- "to suffer"). As a system of treating ailments by the manipulation of bones, it dates from 1889.

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antaphrodisiac (adj.)

1719, "used against sexual appetite;" 1742, "used against venereal disease;" from anti- + Greek aphrodisios "venereal" (see aphrodisiac). From 1753 as a noun, "medicine used against venereal disease." Antaphroditic is from 1706 as a noun, "medicine having the power to mitigate venereal disease;" 1755 as an adjective.

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sequela (n.)

plural sequelae, 1793, originally in pathology, "disease or morbid condition resulting from a previous disease," from Latin sequela "that which follows, consequence" (see sequel).

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patho- 

before vowels path-, word-forming element in science and technical terms meaning "suffering, disease," from Greek pathos "suffering, disease" (from PIE root *kwent(h)- "to suffer").

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pathogenic (adj.)

"producing disease," 1836, from French pathogénique, from Greek pathos "disease" (from PIE root *kwent(h)- "to suffer") + French -génique "producing" (see -gen). Related: Pathogenetic (1838); pathogenicity.

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anaemia (n.)

"deficiency of blood in a living body," 1824, a medical term from French (1761), from Latinized form of Greek anaimia "lack of blood," from anaimos "bloodless," from an- "without" (see an- (1)) + haima "blood" (see -emia).

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amentia (n.)

"mental deficiency," late 14c., from Latin amentia "madness," from amentem "mad," from a for ab "away from" (see a- (2)) + mentem "mind" (from PIE root *men- (1) "to think") + abstract noun ending -ia.

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