Etymology
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vitiate (v.)

"to render vicious, faulty, or imperfect; injure the quality or substance of," 1530s, from Latin vitiatus, past participle of vitiare "to make faulty, injure, spoil, corrupt," from vitium "fault, defect, blemish, crime, vice" (see vice (n.1)). Related: Vitiated; vitiating.

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logorrhea (n.)
1878, from logo- "word, speech" + ending from diarrhea.
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colloquial (adj.)

1751, "pertaining to conversation," from colloquy "a conversation" + -al (1). From 1752 as "peculiar or appropriate to the language of common speech or familiar conversation," especially as distinguished from elegant or formal speech. Related: Colloquially.

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locution (n.)

"style of speech," early 15c., from Latin locutionem (nominative locutio) "a speaking, speech, discourse; way of speaking," noun of action from past-participle stem of loqui "to speak," from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak." Related: Locutionary.

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frankness (n.)
"plainness of speech, candor," 1550s, from frank (adj.) + -ness.
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astigmatism (n.)

"defect in the structure of the eye whereby the rays of light do not converge to a point upon the retina," 1849, coined by the Rev. William Whewell, English polymath, from Greek a- "without" (see a- (3)) + stigmatos genitive of stigma "a mark, spot, puncture," from PIE root *steig- "to stick; pointed" (see stick (v.)).

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oration (n.)

late 14c., oracioun, "a prayer," from Late Latin orationem (nominative oratio) "a speaking, speech, discourse; language, faculty of speech, mode of expressing; prayer," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin ōrare "to pray to, plead, speak before an assembly" (see orator). The usual Old French form was oraison. Meaning "formal speech, discourse, eloquent or weighty address" is recorded from c. 1500.

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peroration (n.)

mid-15c., peroracioun, "a speech, an address," in rhetoric, "the concluding part of an address," involving an emphatic restatement of the principal points, from Latin perorationem (nominative peroratio) "the ending of a speech or argument of a case," from past-participle stem of perorare "argue a case to the end, bring a speech to a close," from per "to the end," hence "thoroughly, completely" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + ōrare "to speak, plead" (see orator).

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-phemia 

word-forming element meaning "speech," from Greek -phemia, from phēmē "speech," from stem of phemi "I speak," cognate with Latin fari "to speak," fama "report, reputation" (from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say").

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sibilant (n.)
"speech sound having a hissing effect," 1772, from sibilant (adj.).
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