Etymology
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heart-felt (adj.)
also heartfelt, "profoundly felt, deep, sincere," 1734, from heart (n.) + past tense of feel (v.).
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high seas (n.)
late 14c., from sea (n.) + high (adj.) with sense (also found in the Latin cognate) of "deep" (compare Old English heahflod "deep water," also Old Persian baršan "height; depth"). Originally "open sea or ocean," later "ocean area not within the territorial boundary of any nation."
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pothole (n.)

also pot-hole, "more or less cylindrical cavity from a few inches to several feet deep in rock," 1826, originally a geological feature in glaciers and gravel beds, from Middle English pot "a pit, a hollow, a deep hole for a mine or from peat-digging" (mid-15c.; 12c. in place-names), now generally obsolete in those senses, but preserved in Scotland and northern England dialect; perhaps ultimately from or related (via a Scandinavian source) to pot (n.1) on notion of "deep, cylindrical shape." Applied to a hole in a road from 1909.

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benthos (n.)
"life forms of the deep ocean and sea floor," 1891, coined by Haeckel from Greek benthos "depth of the sea," which is related to bathos "depth," bathys "deep, high;" which probably is Indo-European but of unknown origin. Adjective benthal is attested from 1877; benthic is attested from 1902.
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sopor (n.)
Latin, "deep sleep, lethargy," from PIE *swep-os-, suffixed form of root *swep- "to sleep."
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jet (n.2)
also jetstone, "deep black lignite," mid-14c., from Anglo-French geet, Old French jaiet "jet, lignite" (12c., Modern French jais), from Latin gagates, from Greek gagates lithos "stone of Gages," town and river in Lycia in Asia Minor. Formerly supposed to be magnetic. From mid-15c. as "a deep, rich, glossy black color" (the color of jet) and as an adjective.
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ground-swell (n.)
also groundswell, "broad, deep swell of the sea," 1783, from ground (n.) + swell (n.). Figurative sense (of sound, emotion, etc.) is attested from 1817.
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lake (n.2)
"deep red coloring matter," 1610s, from French laque (15c., see lac), from which it was obtained.
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afloat (adv., adj.)
Old English aflote, contraction of prepositional phrase on flot; see a- (1) "to" + flot "body of water deep enough for a boat" (see float (n.)).
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luteous (adj.)
"deep orange-yellowish," 1650s, from Latin luteus "golden-yellow, orange-yellow," from lutum, the name of a weed used in dying yellow, a word of unknown origin.
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