Etymology
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supernumerary (adj.)
"exceeding a stated number," c. 1600, from Late Latin supernumarius "excess, counted in over" (of soldiers added to a full legion), from Latin super numerum "beyond the number," from super "beyond, over" (see super-) + numerum, accusative of numerus "number" (see number (n.)). As a noun from 1630s.
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numerable (adj.)

"capable of being counted or reckoned," 1570s, from Latin numerabilis "that can be counted or numbered," from numerare "to count, number," from numerus "a number" (see number (n.)). Related: Numerably.

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systematize (v.)
"make into a system," 1764, from French systématiser or a native formation from system (Greek stem systemat-) + -ize. Related: Systematized; systematizing.
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separatrix (n.)

a line or hooked line used to separate printed figures, originally with numerals and used where modern texts use a decimal point, 1650s, from Late Latin (linea) separatrix, feminine of separator, agent noun from separare "to pull apart" (see separate (v.)). It survives in proofreading.

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numeracy (n.)

"ability with or knowledge of numbers," 1957, on model of literacy, etc., from Latin numerus "a number" (see number (n.)).

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renumber (v.)

also re-number, "count again; fix a new number to," early 15c., from re- "again" + number (v.). Related: Renumbered; renumbering. Middle English also had renombren (mid-15c.), from Old French renombrer.

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enumerate (v.)

"to count; ascertain or tell over the number of;" hence, "mention in detail, recapitulate," 1640s, from or modeled on Latin enumeratus, past participle of enumerare "to reckon up, count over, enumerate," from assimilated form of ex "out, out of" (see ex-) + numerare "to count, number," from numerus "number" (see number (n.)). Middle English had annumerate (early 15c.). Related: Enumerated; enumerating.

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numeration (n.)

early 15c., numeracioun, "method or process of numbering or calculating," from Latin numerationem (nominative numeratio) "a counting out, paying, payment," noun of action from past-participle stem of numerare "to count, number," from numerus "number" (see number (n.)). Meaning "act or process of counting the number of" is from mid-15c.

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numerate (adj.)

early 15c., "numbered, counted," from Latin numeratus "counted out," past participle of numerare "to count, to number," from numerus "a number" (see number (n.)). By 1959 as "acquainted with the basic principles of mathematics" (see numeracy).

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innumerate (adj.)
"unacquainted with the basic principles of mathematics," 1959, based on illiterate, with Latin numerus "a number" (see number (n.)). Related: Innumeracy.
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