Etymology
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tamarind (n.)
c. 1400, "fruit of the tamarind tree, used medicinally," ultimately from Arabic tamr hindi, literally "date of India," from hind "India." First element cognate with Hebrew tamar "palm tree, date palm." Of the tree itself, from 1610s.
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anachronistic (adj.)
"erroneous in date, involving anachronism," 1775; see anachronism + -istic.
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dactyl (n.)

metrical foot, late 14c., from Latin dactylus, from Greek daktylos, a unit of measure (a finger-breadth), also "a fruit of the date tree, a date," literally "finger" (also "toe"), a word of unknown origin. The metrical use (a long syllable followed by two short ones) is by analogy with the three joints of a finger. In English versification it refers to an accented syllable followed by two unaccented. The "date" sense also sometimes was used in early Modern English.

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outmoded (adj.)

"no longer in fashion, out-of-date," 1894, from out- + mode (q.v.); perhaps formed on model of French démoder.

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pre-release (adj.)

"of the period before the date fixed for release," 1916, in reference to motion pictures, from pre- + release (n.). As a noun, "a film or record available on a limited basis before general release," by 1919. As a verb, "to release on a limited basis before the date fixed for release," by 1917 (implied in pre-released).

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poop (n.3)
"up-to-date information," 1941, in poop sheet, U.S. Army slang, of unknown origin, perhaps from poop (n.2).
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do-rag (n.)

by 1973 (said in DAS to date to 1960s), African-American vernacular, from hairdo + rag (n.1).

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modern (n.)

1580s, "person of the present time" (contrasted to ancient), from modern (adj.). From 1897 as "one who is up to date."

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s.a. 

"without date," an abbreviation of Latin sine anno "without a year," from sine "without" (see sans) + ablative of annus "year" (see annual (adj.)).

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jujube (n.)
late 14c., "date-like fruit from a tree found in Asia," from Old French jujube or Medieval Latin jujuba (plural), ill-formed medieval representatives of Late Latin zizyphum, from zizyphus, name of an Asiatic tree with datelike fruit, from Greek zizyphon, from Persian zayzafun. For consonant shift, compare jealous from zealous. The meaning "soft candy with date-like flavor" first recorded 1835.
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