Etymology
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draw-string (n.)

string, cord, lace, or rope used to "draw" (gather, or shorten) fabric or other material by 1831, from draw (v.) + string (n.). Also draw-cord (1840); drawing-string (1784).

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snare (n.1)
"noose for catching animals," late Old English, from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse snara "noose, snare," related to soenri "twisted rope," from Proto-Germanic *snarkho (source also of Middle Dutch snare, Dutch snaar, Old High German snare, German Schnur "noose, cord," Old English snear "a string, cord"). Figuratively from c. 1300.
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funipendulous (adj.)
"hanging from a rope," 1706, from stem of Latin funis "a cord, rope" + pendulus (see pendulous) + -ous.
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kaffiyeh (n.)
also keffieh, keffiyeh, small shawl or scarf worn with a cord around the head by some Arab men, 1817.
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plumb-line (n.)

"a cord or line with a metal bob attached to one end, used to determine vertical direction," mid-15c., from plumb (n.) + line (n.).

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neurosurgeon (n.)

also neuro-surgeon, "one who does surgery on the nervous system," especially the brain and spinal cord, 1918, from neuro- + surgeon. Related: Neurosurgery; neurosurgical.

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coir (n.)

also coire, "prepared coconut fiber" (used for making ropes, mats, etc.), 1580s, from Malayalam (Dravidian) kayar "cord," from kayaru "to be twisted."

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myelo- 

before vowels myel-, word-forming element meaning "marrow, spinal cord," from Greek myelos "marrow; the brain," a word of unknown origin.

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pith (v.)

1805, "to kill by piercing the spinal cord," from pith (n.). By 1852 as "remove or extract the pith from." Related: Pithed; pithing.

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sheave (n.)
"grooved wheel to receive a cord, pulley" (mid-14c.), also "slice of bread" (late 14c.), related to shive (n.).
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