Etymology
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retype (v.)

also re-type, 1898, "copy with a typewriter," from re- "again" + type (v.). Related: Retyped; retyping.

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transcript (n.)
"written copy of a document," c. 1300, from Medieval Latin transcriptum, neuter past participle of Latin transcribere (see transcribe).
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calque (n.)
"loan translation of a foreign word or phrase," 1937, from French calque, literally "a copy," from calquer "to trace by rubbing" (itself borrowed in English 1660s as calk "to copy by tracing"), a 16c. borrowing by French of Italian calcare, from Latin calcare "to tread, to press down."
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imitation (n.)

c. 1400, "emulation; act of copying," from Old French imitacion, from Latin imitationem (nominative imitatio) "a copying, imitation," noun of action from past participle stem of imitari "to copy, portray, imitate," from PIE *im-eto-, from root *aim- "to copy." Meaning "an artificial likeness" is from c. 1600. As an adjective, from 1840.

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imagination (n.)

"faculty of the mind which forms and manipulates images," mid-14c., ymaginacion, from Old French imaginacion "concept, mental picture; hallucination," from Latin imaginationem (nominative imaginatio) "imagination, a fancy," noun of action from past participle stem of imaginari "to form an image of, represent"), from imago "an image, a likeness," from stem of imitari "to copy, imitate" (from PIE root *aim- "to copy") 

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leg-work (n.)
also legwork, 1891, from leg (n.) + work (n.). Originally news reporter slang for an assignment that promised more walking than copy.
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counterfeiter (n.)

early 15c., "one who imitates or makes a copy of," especially with intent to deceive or defraud, agent noun from counterfeit (v.).

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imago (n.)

"final or adult stage of an insect," 1797, from Latin imago "an image, a likeness," from stem of imitari "to copy, imitate" (from PIE root *aim- "to copy"). "The name is due to the fact that such an insect, having passed through its larval stages, and having, as it were, cast off its mask or disguise, has become a true representation or image of its species." [Century Dictionary]

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mimic (v.)

"act in imitation of, imitate or copy in speech or action," 1680s, from mimic (n.). Related: Mimicked; mimicking.

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indescript (adj.)

"undescribed," 1831, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + Latin descriptus, past participle of describere "to write down, copy; sketch, represent" (see describe).

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