Etymology
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manga (n.)

"Japanese comic books or graphic novels," c. 1984, from Japanese, "cartoon, caricature," literally "involuntary pictures." A term said to have been coined 1814 by artist Katsushika Hokusai to "convey a sense of free-flowing composition and quirky style." Also see anime.

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abalienate (v.)
Origin and meaning of abalienate

in civil law, "transfer title of ownership to another," 1550s, from Latin abalienatus, past participle of abalienare "to remove, separate, alienate, make formal transfer of," literally "to convey away," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + alienare "to separate" (from alius "another, other, different," from PIE root *al- "beyond"). Related: Abalienated; abalienating.

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vector (n.)

"quantity having magnitude and direction," 1846; earlier "line joining a fixed point and a variable point," 1704, from Latin vector "one who carries or conveys, carrier" (also "one who rides"), agent noun from past-participle stem of vehere "carry, convey" (from PIE root *wegh- "to go, move, transport in a vehicle"). Related: Vectorial.

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apologue (n.)
"moral fable, fictitious story intended to convey useful truths," 1550s, from French apologue, from Latin apologus, from Greek apologos "a story, tale, fable," from apo "off, away from" (see apo-) + logos "speech" (see Logos). Literally, "(that which comes) from a speech."
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makeover (n.)

also make-over, "change of a person's appearance," especially by hair-styling and cosmetics, by 1981, from phrase make over in sense "to refashion, reconstruct" (1690s); from make (v.) + over (adv.). Make over in the sense of "transfer the title of, convey" is recorded by 1540s.

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overbear (v.)

mid-14c., overberen, "to carry over, transfer, convey," a sense now obsolete (rendering Latin transferre), from over- + bear (v.). Meaning "to bear down by weight of physical force, overpower," is from 1535 (in Coverdale), originally nautical, of an overwhelming wind; figurative sense of "to overcome and repress by power, authority, etc." is from 1560s.

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vehicle (n.)

1610s, "a medium through which a drug or medicine is administered," also "any means of conveying or transmitting," from French véhicule (16c.), from Latin vehiculum "means of transport, vehicle, carriage, conveyance," from vehere "to bear, carry, convey" (from PIE root *wegh- "to go, move, transport in a vehicle," which also is the source of English wagon). Sense of "cart or other conveyance" in English first recorded 1650s.

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ferry (n.)
early 15c., "a passage over a river," from the verb or from Old Norse ferju-, in compounds, "passage across water," ultimately from the same Germanic root as ferry (v.). Meaning "place where boats pass over a body of water" is from mid-15c. The sense "boat or raft to convey passengers and goods short distances across a body of water" (1580s) is a shortening of ferry boat (mid-15c.).
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introduce (v.)

early 15c., "convey or bring (something) in or into," a back-formation from introduction or else from Latin introducere "to lead in, bring in," from intro- "inward, to the inside" (see intro-) + ducere "to lead" (from PIE root *deuk- "to lead").

Meaning "to bring forward, open to notice" (of a subject, etc.) is from 1550s. Sense of "bring into personal acquaintance, make known" (as of one person to another) is from 1650s. Related: Introduced; introducing.

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externalize (v.)

"to embody in an outward form; convey the quality of external reality upon," 1846, from external + -ize. Related: Externalized; externalizing.

Self-government begins with a reverential recognition of a supreme law: its process is a constant endeavor to render that law objective, real, operative—to externalize it, if we may use the term. [American Review, July, 1846]
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