Etymology
Advertisement
pleasantry (n.)

1650s, "sprightly humor in conversation, witticism, raillery," from French plaisanterie "joke, jest; joking, jesting," from plaisant "pleasant, pleasing, agreeable" (see pleasant). From 1701 as "a sprightly or humorous saying." Related: Pleasantries.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
chime (v.)
mid-14c., chyme, from chime (n.). Originally of metal, etc.; of voices from late 14c. To chime in originally was musical, "join harmoniously;" of conversation by 1838. Related: Chimed; chiming.
Related entries & more 
dialect (n.)

1570s, "language, speech, mode of speech," especially "form of speech of a region or group, idiom of a locality or class" as distinguished from the general accepted literary language, also "one of a number of related modes of speech regarded as descended from a common origin," from French dialecte, from Latin dialectus "local language, way of speaking, conversation," from Greek dialektos "talk, conversation, speech;" also "the language of a country, dialect," from dialegesthai "converse with each other, discuss, argue," from dia "across, between" (see dia-) + legein "speak" from PIE root *leg- (1) "to collect, gather," with derivatives meaning "to speak (to 'pick out words')").

Related entries & more 
rapping (n.)

early 15c., "a knocking, colliding; production of sound by a rap," verbal noun from rap (v.1). Meaning "talking, chatting, conversation" is from 1969; meaning "rap music performance" is from 1979, both from rap (v.2).

Related entries & more 
dialectic (n.)

1580s, earlier dialatik (late 14c.), "critical examination of the truth of an opinion, formal reason and logic applied to rhetoric and refutation," from Old French dialectique (12c.) and directly from Latin dialectica, from Greek dialektike (techne) "(art of) philosophical discussion or discourse," fem. of dialektikos "of conversation, discourse," from dialektos "discourse, conversation" (see dialect).

Originally synonymous with logic; in modern philosophy refined by Kant ("the theory of false argumentation leading to contradictions and fallacies), then by Hegel, who made it mean "process of resolving or merging contradictions in character to attain higher truths." Used generally in 20c. Marxism for "evolution by means of contradictions." Related: Dialectics.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
apropos (adv.)
1660s, "opportunely," from French à propos "to the purpose," from propos "thing said in conversation, talk; purpose, plan," from Latin propositium "purpose," past participle of proponere "to set forth, propose" (see propound). Meaning "as regards, with reference to" (with of) is 1761, from French. As an adjective, "to the point or purpose," from 1690s.
Related entries & more 
parley (n.)

"conference, conversation, speech," especially with an enemy, mid-15c., parlai, from Old French parlée, from fem. past participle of Old French parler "to speak" (11c.), from Vulgar Latin *paraulare, from Late Latin parabolare "to speak (in parables)," from parabola "speech, discourse," from Latin parabola "comparison" (see parable).

Related entries & more 
discursive (adj.)

1590s, "passing rapidly from one subject to another," from French discursif, from Medieval Latin discursivus, from Latin discursus "a running about," in Late Latin "conversation," in Medieval Latin "reasoning" (see discourse (n.)). As "relating to the understanding" (often opposed to intuitive), from c. 1600. Related: Discursively.

Related entries & more 
affable (adj.)
of persons, "open to conversation or approach," late 15c., from Old French affable "benign, approachable" (14c.), from Latin affabilis "approachable, courteous, kind, friendly," literally "who can be (easily) spoken to," from affari "to speak to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + fari "to speak," from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say." Related: Affably.
Related entries & more 
interlocutor (n.)
1510s, "one who speaks in a dialogue or conversation," agent noun from Latin interlocut-, past participle stem of interloqui "speak between; interrupt," from inter "between" (see inter-) + loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak").

In minstrel shows, the name of a straight-man character (1870) who was the questioner of the end men. Related: Interlocutory. Fem. forms include interlocutress (1858), interlocutrix (1846), interlocutrice (1848).
Related entries & more 

Page 3