Etymology
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contrast (n.)

1711, "comparison by exhibiting the dissimilar or contrary qualities in the things compared," from contrast (v.). From 1764 as "that which shows striking difference from another when compared to it," also "opposition in respect of certain qualities."

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adverse (adj.)
late 14c., "contrary, opposing," from Old French advers, earlier avers (13c., Modern French adverse) "antagonistic, unfriendly, contrary, foreign" (as in gent avers "infidel race"), from Latin adversus "turned against, turned toward, fronting, facing," figuratively "hostile, adverse, unfavorable," past participle of advertere "to turn toward," from ad "to" (see ad-) + vertere "to turn, turn back; be turned; convert, transform, translate; be changed" (from PIE root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend"). For distinction of use, see averse. Related: Adversely.
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preposterous (adj.)

1540s, "contrary to nature, reason, or common sense," from Latin praeposterus "absurd, contrary to nature, inverted, perverted, in reverse order," literally "before-behind" (compare topsy-turvy,cart before the horse), from prae "before" (see pre-) + posterus "subsequent, coming after," from post "after" (see post-).

The sense gradually shaded into "foolish, ridiculous, stupid, absurd." The literal meaning "reversed in order or arrangement, having that last which ought to be first" (1550s) is now obsolete in English. In 17c. English also had a verb preposterate "to make preposterous, pervert, invert." Related: Preposterously; preposterousness.

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whereas (adv.)

mid-14c., "where;" early 15c. as a conjunction, "in consideration of the fact that, considering that things are so; while on the contrary," from where (in the sense of "in which position or circumstances") + as.

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parapraxis (n.)

"faulty action, blunder," 1904, from Modern Latin, from para-, here meaning "contrary" (see para- (1)) + Greek praxis "a doing, transaction, business" (see praxis). In psychology, a minor error held to reveal a subconscious motive.

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countermand (v.)

"to revoke (a command or order)," early 15c., contremaunden, from Anglo-French and Old French contremander "reverse an order or command" (13c.), from contre- "against" (see contra (prep., adv.)) + mander, from Latin mandare "to order" (see mandate (n.)). Related: Countermanded; countermanding. As a noun, "a contrary order," 1540s.

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inofficious (adj.)
c. 1600, "neglecting one's duty;" in law, "not in accord with one's moral duty," 1660s, from Medieval Latin inofficiosus "contrary to duty; harmful," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1) + Latin officiosus "dutiful, obliging" (see officious).
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untrue (adj.)
Old English untreowe "unfaithful" (of persons), from un- (1) "not" + true (adj.). Similar formation in Middle Dutch ongetrouwe, Middle Low German ungetruwe, Old High German ungitriuwi, Old Norse utryggr. Meaning "contrary to facts" is attested from c. 1300.
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unlawful (adj.)
"contrary to law, illegal," c. 1300, from un- (1) "not" + lawful. Unlawful assembly is recorded in statutes from late 15c. Related: Unlawfully. Old English had a noun unlagu ("unlaw") "illegal action, abuse of law."
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diametrically (adv.)

1630s, "completely, in an extreme degree" (with opposed, contrary, etc.), from diametrical (see diametric + -al (1)) + -ly (2). Originally and mostly in figurative use: the two points that mark the ends of a line of diameter are opposite one another. Diametrical opposition translates Aristotle's phrase for "extreme opposition."

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