Etymology
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La-Z-Boy 
brand of recliner chair, 1929, Floral City Furniture Co., Monroe, Michigan, U.S. According to company lore, chosen from names submitted in a contest. See lazy + boy.
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coaching (n.)

1825, "the use of a coach as a public conveyance;" 1849 as "special instruction or training for an exam or an athletic contest;" verbal noun from coach (v.). 

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decathlon (n.)

modern composite Olympic event consisting of ten challenges, 1912, from deca- "ten" (from PIE root *dekm- "ten") + Greek athlon "contest, prize," which is of uncertain origin.

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contestation (n.)

1540s, "action of calling to witness," from Latin contestationem (nominative contestatio), "an attesting, testimony," noun of action from past-participle stem of contestari (see contest (v.)). Meaning "disputation, controversy" is from 1570s.

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win (n.)
Old English winn "labor, toil; strife, conflict; profit, gain," from the source of win (v.). Modern sense of "a victory in a game or contest" is first attested 1862, from the verb.
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coprolalia (n.)

"obsessive use of obscene language, either through mental illness or perversion," 1886, from French coprolalie, coined 1885 by de la Tourette, from copro- "dung, filth" + Greek lalia "talk, prattle, a speaking," from lalein "to speak, prattle," which is of echoic origin.

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cock-fighting (n.)

mid-15c., cokfytyng, match or contest between cocks (see cock (n.1)). Cock-fight (n.) is from 1560s.

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seizure (n.)

late 15c., "act or action of taking hold or possession, legally or by force," from seize + -ure. Earlier in this sense was the verbal noun seizing (seising early 14c.). The meaning "sudden attack or onset" of an illness, etc., is attested from 1779.

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delirious (adj.)

1703, "wandering in the mind, affected with delirium" (as a result of fever or illness), from stem of delirium + -ous. The earlier adjective was delirous (1650s). Figurative sense of "characterized by or proceeding from wild excitement or exaggerated emotion" is by 1791. Related: Deliriously; deliriousness.

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mismatch (n.)

"a bad match, discrepancy, lack of correspondence," c. 1600, from mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + match (n.2). Sports sense of "unfair contest due to unequal abilities" is by 1954. Related: Mismatchment (1841).

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