Etymology
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abstract (v.)
Origin and meaning of abstract

1540s, "to draw away, withdraw, remove" (transitive), from Latin abstractus or else from abstract (adj.). From 1610s in the philosophical sense "consider as a general object or idea without regard to matter." Related: Abstracted; abstracting.

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ill-advised (adj.)

1590s, from ill (adv.) + advised, past-participle adjective from advise (v.) in its original (but now obsolete) reflexive sense "take thought, consider." Related: Ill-advisedly.

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regard (v.)

mid-14c., regarden, "consider" (that something is so or a certain way), from Old French regarder "to look at, take notice of," from re-, here perhaps an intensive prefix, + garder "look, heed," from a Germanic language (see guard (n.)).

Sense of "consider of importance or interest" is from 1510s. Meaning "look upon, observe" is from 1520s, as is that of "observe a certain respect toward." From 1610s as "look upon" (with a certain feeling), "have or show a certain feeling for." Related: Regarded; regarding.

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bethink (v.)

reflexive verb, Middle English bithinken, "think, meditate, reflect, ponder," from Old English beþencan "to consider, remember, take thought for, reflect," from be- + þencan "to think" (see think). Related: Bethought.

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deliberate (v.)

1540s, "weigh in the mind, consider carefully;" 1550s, "discuss and examine the reasons for or against," from Latin deliberatus, past participle of deliberare "consider carefully, consult," literally "weigh well," from de, here probably "entirely" (see de-) + -liberare, altered (probably by influence of liberare "to free, liberate") from librare "to balance, make level," from libra "pair of scales, a balance" (see Libra). Related: Deliberated; deliberating. The earlier form of the verb in English was deliberen (late 14c.), from Old French deliberer and directly from Latin deliberare.

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meditative (adj.)

1650s, of persons, "inclined to meditation," from Late Latin meditativus, from meditat-, past-participle stem of Latin meditari "to meditate, think over, reflect, consider," frequentative form of PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures." Related: Meditatively; meditativeness.

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Daedalus 

father of Icarus in Greek mythology, builder of the Cretan labyrinth, from Latin Daedelus, from Greek Daidalos, literally "the cunning worker," from or related to daidallein "to work artfully, embellish," a word of disputed etymology. Beekes writes, "we should consider Pre-Greek origin." Related: Daedalian.

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examination (n.)

late 14c., "action of testing or judging; judicial inquiry," from Old French examinacion, from Latin examinationem (nominative examinatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of examinare "to weigh; to ponder, consider" (see examine). Sense of "test of knowledge" is attested from 1610s.

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analogize (v.)

"explain by analogy, exhibit resemblances between," 1650s, from analogy + -ize, or else from French analogiser (17c.). Greek analogizesthai "to reckon, sum up, calculate, consider" suits the form but not the sense. Related: Analogized; analogizing.

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comment (v.)
Origin and meaning of comment

early 15c.,"expound, explain, make remarks or notes upon" (transitive), from Medieval Latin commentare, alternative form of Latin commentari "consider thoroughly, think over, discuss, write upon," from commentum "comment, interpretation" (see comment (n.)). Related: Commented; commenting.

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