Etymology
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clean-up (n.)

also cleanup, 1856, "act of cleaning up,  a general cleaning," from clean + up. Meaning "a profit" is recorded from 1878. Verbal phrase clean up "make a large profit" is from 1929. The adjective, in the baseball sense, is recorded by 1910 in reference to the hitter who bats fourth in the lineup: His job is to drive in runs by scoring the players who hit before him and thus "clean up" the bases.

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heads-up (adj.)
"clever, alert," 1926, from warning cry "heads up!" (i.e. "look up!"). As a noun, "a notification, a warning," by 1988.
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push-up (n.)

also pushup, type of physical exercise (originally done on parallel bars), 1893, from the verbal phrase (by 1660s); see push (v.) + up (adv.). As an adjective, "that pushes up or may be pushed up," from 1892; of bras from 1957. Related: Push-ups

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paste-up (n.)

1930, in printing, "a plan of a page with the position of text, illustrations, etc. indicated," from verbal phrase; see paste (v.) + up (adv.).

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close-up (n.)
1913, in photography, etc.; see close (adv.) + up (adv.).
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set-up (n.)
"arrangement," 1890, from verbal phrase set up, attested from c. 1200 as "to make ready for use" and from 1950 (in pugilism) as "to bring (someone) to a vulnerable position;" from set (v.) + up (adv.). The verbal phrase also can mean "to establish" (early 15c.) and "put drinks before customers" (1880).
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shake-up (n.)
also shakeup, "reorganization," 1899, from verbal phrase, from shake (v.) + up (adv.).
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wake-up (n.)
something that brings one to alertness or out of sleep, 1965, often in the 1960s in reference to a shot of heroin in the morning. Phrase wake-up call is attested from 1968, originally a call one received from the hotel desk in the morning. Verbal phrase wake up is from 1530s; earlier the adverb was out (late 14c.)
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hard-up (adj.)
"in difficulties," especially "short of money," 1821, slang; it was earlier a nautical expression, in reference to steering.
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dress-up (n.)

"act of dressing up in one's best clothes," 1865, from the verbal phrase (17c.); see dress (v.) + up (adv.).

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