Etymology
Advertisement
constructor (n.)

"a builder," 1751, from Medieval Latin constructor, agent noun from Latin construere "to pile up together, accumulate; build, make, erect," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + struere "to pile up" (from PIE *streu-, extended form of root *stere- "to spread").

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
conduce (v.)

c. 1400, "to lead, conduct" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin conducere "to lead or bring together, contribute, serve," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + ducere "to lead" (from PIE root *deuk- "to lead"). Intransitive sense of "aid in or contribute toward a result" is from 1580s.

Related entries & more 
conscript (adj.)

mid-15c., "registered, enrolled," from Latin conscriptus "enrolled, chosen, elect," past participle of conscribere "to draw up, list," literally "to write together" from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + scribere "to write" (from PIE root *skribh- "to cut").

Related entries & more 
concent (n.)

"harmony, concord of sounds," 1580s, from Latin concentus "a singing together, harmony," from concinere "to sing or sound together," from con- "with, together" (see con-) + canere "to sing" (from PIE root *kan- "to sing"). Often misspelled consent or confused with that word.

Related entries & more 
confect (v.)

"to make up or compound," especially "to make into sweetmeats," late 14c., from Latin confectus, past participle of conficere "to prepare," from assimilated form of com "with" (see con-) + combining form of facere "to make, to do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Related: Confected; confecting.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
confluent (adj.)

"flowing together, meeting in their courses," late 15c., from Latin confluentem (nominative confluens), present participle of confluere "to flow together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + fluere "to flow" (see fluent). The noun meaning "a stream which flows into another" is from 1850.

Related entries & more 
consanguinity (n.)

"kinship by common descent," c. 1400, from Old French consanguinité and directly from Latin consanguinitatem (nominative consanguinitas), from consanguineus "of the same blood," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + sanguineus "of blood" (see sanguinary).

Related entries & more 
convolve (v.)

"to roll or wind together," 1640s, from Latin convolvere (past participle convolutus) "to roll together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + volvere "to roll," from PIE root *wel- (3) "to turn, revolve." Related: Convolvement; convolvent.

Related entries & more 
conjunct (adj.)

"conjoined, conjoint," mid-15c., from Latin coniunctus, past participle of coniugare "to join together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + iugare "to join," from iugum "yoke" (from PIE root *yeug- "to join"). A doublet of conjoint.

Related entries & more 
contractile (adj.)

"susceptible of contraction," 1706, from French contractile, from Latin contract-, past participle stem of contrahere "to draw several objects together; draw in, shorten," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + trahere "to draw" (see tract (n.1)). Related: Contractility.

Related entries & more 

Page 3