Etymology
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carl (n.)

c. 1300, "bondsman; common man, man of low birth," from Old Norse karl "man (as opposed to "woman"), male, freeman," from Proto-Germanic *karlon- (source also of Dutch karel "a fellow," Old High German karl "a man, husband), the same base that produced Old English ceorl "man of low degree" (see churl) and the masc. proper name Carl.

The Mellere was a stout carle for the nones [Chaucer]
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churl (n.)

Old English ceorl "peasant, one of the lowest class of freemen, man without rank," from Proto-Germanic *kerlaz, *karlaz (source also of Old Frisian zerl "man, fellow," Middle Low German kerle, Dutch kerel "freeman of low degree," German Kerl "man, husband," Old Norse karl "old man, man").

It had various meaning in early Middle English, including "man of the common people," "a country man," "husbandman," "free peasant;" by 1300, it meant "bondman, villain," also "fellow of low birth or rude manners."

For words for "common man" that acquire an insulting flavor over time, compare boor, villain. In this case, however, the same word also has come to mean "king" in many languages (such as Lithuanian karalius, Czech kral, Polish król) via Charlemagne.

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androgynous (adj.)

1620s, "womanish" (of a man); 1650s, "having two sexes, being both male and female," from Latin androgynus, from Greek androgynos "hermaphrodite, male and female in one; womanish man;" as an adjective (of baths) "common to men and women," from andros, genitive of anēr "male" (from PIE root *ner- (2) "man") + gynē "woman" (from PIE root *gwen- "woman"). Related: Androgynal (1640s).

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caroline (adj.)
1650s, "of or pertaining to a Charles," from French, from Medieval Latin Carolus "Charles" (a name from the common Germanic noun meaning "man, husband;" see carl). Especially of Charlemagne, or, in English history, Charles I and Charles II.
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dell (n.2)

rogue's cant 16c.-17c. for "a wench, a young girl of the vagrant class," 1560s, of uncertain origin.

A Dell is a yonge wenche, able for generation, and not yet knowen or broken by the vpright man. ... [W]hen they have beene lyen with all by the vpright man then they be Doxes, and no Dells. [Thomas Harman, "A Caveat or Warning for Common Cursitors," 1567]
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mick (n.)

also Mick, derogatory slang for "an Irishman," by 1856, from the nickname form of the common Irish given name Michael (q.v.). Micky is attested in U.S. slang for "an Irish boy or man" by 1858.

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Serb (n.)

1786, but in reference to the Wends; by 1844 as "native of Serbia," from Serbian Srb, perhaps from a root meaning "man." Serbian is attested from 1833 as an adjective, 1839 as a noun. More common in 19c. was Servian.

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cosmopolite (n.)

"man of the world; citizen of the world, one who is cosmopolitan in ideas or life," 1610s, from Latinized form of Greek kosmopolites "citizen of the world," from kosmos "world" (see cosmos) + polites "citizen," from polis "city" (see polis). In common use 17c. in a neutral sense; it faded in 18c. but was revived from c. 1800 with a tinge of reproachfulness (opposed to patriot).

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misandry (n.)

"hatred of males," 1878, from miso- "hatred" + andros "of man, male," genitive of anēr "man" (from PIE root *ner- (2) "man"). Related: Misandrist.

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bridegroom (n.)
"man newly married or about to be," Old English brydguma "suitor," from bryd "bride" (see bride) + guma "man," from Proto-Germanic *gumon- (source also of Old Norse gumi, Old High German gomo), literally "earthling, earthly being," as opposed to the gods, from suffixed form of PIE root *dhghem- "earth." Ending altered 16c. by folk etymology after groom (n.) "groom, boy, lad" (q.v.).

A common Germanic compound (compare Old Saxon brudigumo, Old Norse bruðgumi, Old High German brutigomo, German Bräutigam), except in Gothic, which used bruþsfaþs, literally "bride's lord."
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