Etymology
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cenogamy (n.)

also coenogamy, "state of having husbands or wives in common," 1883,  from Latinized form of Greek koinos "common" (see coeno-) + -gamy. Related: Cenogamous; coenogamous.

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communicative (adj.)

late 14c., "that communicates," from French communicatif, from Latin communicat-, past participle stem of communicare "to share, divide out; communicate, impart, inform; join, unite, participate in," literally "to make common," related to communis "common, public, general" (see common (adj.)). Meaning "talkative, not reserved, ready to converse" is recorded from 1650s. Related: Communicativeness.

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Bros. 
common commercial abbreviation of Brothers.
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coeno- 

before vowels coen-, word-forming element meaning "common," from Latinized form of Greek koinos "common, public, shared, general, ordinary," from PIE *kom "beside, near, by, with" (see com-).

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Vulgate (n.)
Latin translation of the Bible, especially that completed in 405 by St. Jerome (c.340-420), c. 1600, from Medieval Latin Vulgata, from Late Latin vulgata "common, general, ordinary, popular" (in vulgata editio "popular edition"), from Latin vulgata, fem. past participle of vulgare "make common or public, spread among the multitude," from vulgus "the common people" (see vulgar). So called because the translations made the book accessible to the common people of ancient Rome.
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demotic (adj.)

"of or belonging to the people," especially "pertaining to the common people, popular, vulgar," 1822, from Latinized form of Greek dēmotikos "of or for the common people, in common use," from dēmos "common people," originally "district," from PIE *da-mo- "division," from root *da- "to divide." Originally in English it was used in reference to the simpler of two forms of ancient Egyptian writing (opposed to hieratic or hieroglyphic); the broader sense is by 1831. Used of the popular form of modern Greek since 1927.

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communicable (adj.)

late 14c., "communicating," from Old French communicable and directly from Late Latin communicabilis, from Latin communicare "to share, divide out; communicate, impart, inform; join, unite, participate in," literally "to make common," related to communis "common, public, general" (see common (adj.)). Meaning "capable of being imparted or transferred" is from 1530s. Sense of "ready to converse or impart information" is from 1530s. Related: Communicability.

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marathon (n.)

1896, marathon race, from story of Greek hero Pheidippides, who in 490 B.C.E. ran to Athens from the Plains of Marathon to tell of the allied Greek victory there over Persian army. The original story (Herodotus) is that he ran from Athens to Sparta to seek aid, which arrived too late to participate in the battle.

It was introduced as an athletic event in the 1896 revival of the Olympic Games, based on a later, less likely story, that Pheidippides ran to Athens from the battlefield with news of the victory. The word quickly was extended to mean "any very long event or activity." The place name is literally "fennel-field." Related: Marathoner (by 1912); Marathonian.

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