Etymology
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coddle (v.)

c. 1600, "boil gently," probably from caudle (n.) "warm drink for invalids" (c. 1300), from Anglo-French caudel (c. 1300), ultimately from Latin calidium "warm drink, warm wine and water," neuter of calidus "hot," from calere "be warm" (from PIE root *kele- (1) "warm").

The verb meaning "treat tenderly, make effeminate by pampering" first recorded 1815 (in Jane Austen's "Emma"), but the connection to the other word is uncertain; it might as well derive from caudle. Related: Coddled; coddling.

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codger (n.)

1756, "old man, odd person;" 1796, "mean, miserly man;" probably a variant of cadger "beggar" (see cadge (v.)), which is of unknown origin.

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codify (v.)

"to reduce to a code or digest, to arrange or systematize," c. 1800 (Bentham), from code (n.) + -ify. Related: codified; codifying.

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codominant (adj.)

also co-dominant, "sharing dominance equally," 1898, in forestry, from co- + dominant.

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code (v.)

"to put into code," 1815, from code (n.). Specifically "to put into computer code" from 1947. Intransitive sense "write computer code" is by 1987. Related: Coded; coding.

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codification (n.)

"act or process of reducing to a code or system," 1817 (Bentham), noun of action from codify.

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