Etymology
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cupboard (n.)

late 14c., "a board or table to place cups and like objects," from cup (n.) + board (n.1). As a type of open or closed cabinet for food, etc., from early 16c.

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classmate (n.)
"one of the same class at school or college," 1713, from class (n.) + mate (n.).
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classism (n.)
"distinction of class," 1842, from class (n.) + -ism.
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classy (adj.)
"pertaining to or characteristic of a (high) class," 1891, from class (n.) + -y (2). Related: Classily; classiness.
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hypogamy (n.)
"marriage of a woman into a lower class, caste, or tribe," 1940, an anthropologist's word first used in an Indian context, from hypo- "under, beneath" + -gamy "marriage." Related: Hypogamous.
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bung-hole (n.)
also bunghole, "hole in a cask through which is it filled, closed by a stopper," 1570s, from bung (n.) + hole (n.). Sense extended to "anus" by c. 1600.
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underclass (n.)
"subordinate social class," 1894, from under (adj.) + class (n.). A loan-translation of Swedish underklass.
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autoclave (n.)

"stewing apparatus the lid of which is kept closed and tight by the steam itself," 1847, from French (1821), literally "self-locking," from auto- "self" (see auto-) + clave, from Latin clavis "key" (from PIE root *klau- "hook").

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ope (adj.)

short for open (adj.), early 13c. "not closed; not hidden;" originally as awake is from awaken, etc. As a verb, "to open," from mid-15c.; now obsolete or archaic. Middle English had ope-head "bare-headed" (c. 1300).

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outclass (v.)

1870, originally in sports, "to beat (a rival) so completely as to put him out of the same class," from out- + class (n.).

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