Etymology
Advertisement
side-step (n.)

also sidestep, 1757, "a stepping to the side" (originally in military drill), from side (adj.) + step (n.). The verb is recorded from 1895, "step to one side;" the figurative sense of "evade (an issue), prevaricate" is attested from 1900.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
preclude (v.)

1610s, "prevent by anticipative action," from Latin praecludere "to close, shut off; hinder, impede," from prae "before, ahead" (see pre-) + claudere "to shut" (see close (v.)). The more literal sense of "close, shut up, prevent access to" (1620s) probably is obsolete. Related: Precluded; precluding.

Related entries & more 
roundup (n.)

also round-up, by 1869 in the cattle drive sense; from verbal phrase round up "to collect in a mass" (1610s; specifically by 1847 of livestock in grazing areas, "drive or bring together in close order"); see round (v.) + up (adv.). The original notion is presumably "heap or fill so as to make round at the top." The meaning "summary of news items" is recorded from 1886.

Related entries & more 
nearly (adv.)

1530s, "carefully," 1570s, "close at hand, in close proximity;" see near + -ly (2). Meaning "almost, all but, within a little of" is from 1680s.

Related entries & more 
goose-step (n.)

1806, originally a military drill to teach balance; "to stand on each leg alternately and swing the other back and forth." This, presumably, reminded someone of a goose's way of walking. In reference to "marching without bending the knees" (as in Nazi military reviews) it apparently is first recorded 1916. As a verb by 1854.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
orderly (adv.)

late 15c., "in due order, duly, properly," from order + -ly (2).

Related entries & more 
chock (adv.)

"tightly, close up against," 1799, back formation from chock-full.

Related entries & more 
cloison (n.)

"a partition, a dividing band," 1690s, from French cloison, from Vulgar Latin *clausionem (nominative *clausio), noun of action from past participle stem of Latin claudere "to close, shut" (see close (v.)). Related: Cloisonnage.

Related entries & more 
claustral (adj.)

mid-15c., "of or pertaining to a cloister, monastic," from Medieval Latin claustralis "pertaining to a claustrum," ("cloister"), from past participle of Latin claudere "to close" (see close (v.), and compare cloister). From 1862 as "resembling a cloister."

Related entries & more 
occlude (v.)

"to shut up or stop up so as to prevent anything from passing through," 1590s, from Latin occludere (past participle occlusus) "shut up, close up," from assimilated form of ob "in front of, against" (see ob-) + claudere "to shut, close" (see close (v.)). Of teeth, "come in contact with another tooth," 1888. Related: Occluded; occluding.

Related entries & more 

Page 3