Etymology
Advertisement
No results were found for classic. Showing results for classical.
bipedal (adj.)
c. 1600, "having two feet," from biped + -al (1). Classical Latin bipedalis meant "two feet long or thick."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
inferno (n.)
1834, "Hell, the infernal regions," from Italian inferno, from Late Latin infernus "Hell," in classical Latin "the lower world" (see infernal). As "a large, raging fire" from 1928.
Related entries & more 
inductor (n.)
1650s, "one who initiates," agent noun from Latin stem of induce. Classical Latin inductor meant "one who stirs up, an instigator." Electromagnetic senses are from 1837.
Related entries & more 
cameral (adj.)
"of or pertaining to a chamber," 1762, from Medieval Latin camera "a chamber, public office, treasury," in classical Latin "a vaulted room" (see camera, and compare chamber) + -al (1).
Related entries & more 
odeum (n.)

"classical concert hall," c. 1600, from Latin odeum, from Greek ōdeion, the name of a public building in Athens designed for musical performances, from ōidē "song" (see ode).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
sanguicolous (adj.)

"living in the blood" (as a parasite does), by 1889, from Latin sanguis "blood" (see sanguinary) + colere "to inhabit" (see colony). Also, with classical stem, sanguinicolous.

Related entries & more 
criteria (n.)

"standards of judgment or criticism, rules by which opinions or conduct can be tested," 1620s, classical plural of criterion (q.v.). Also see -a (2). Related: Criterial.

Related entries & more 
daimon (n.)

a transliteration of Greek daimōn "lesser god, guiding spirit, tutelary deity," 1852; see demon. Employed to avoid the post-classical associations of demon. Related: Daimonic.

Related entries & more 
quinque- 

before vowels quinqu-, word-forming element from classical Latin meaning "five, consisting of or having five," from Latin quinque "five" (by assimilation from PIE root *penkwe- "five").

Related entries & more 
populous (adj.)

"having many inhabitants in proportion to the extent of the country," early 15c., from post-classical Latin populosus "full of people, populous," from populus "people" (see people (n.)). Related: Populously; populousness.

Related entries & more 

Page 3