Etymology
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crustacean (n.)

an animal of the class Crustacea, 1835; see Crustacea + -an. As an adjective, "of or pertaining to an animal of the class Crustacea," 1858 (an earlier adjective was crustaceous, "pertaining to crust, crust-like," 1640s).

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masses (n.)
"people of the lower class," 1836; plural of mass (n.1).
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cephalopod (n.)

one of a class of mollusks notable for having tentacles attached to a distinct head, 1825, from French cephalopode, from Modern Latin Cephalopoda (the class name), from Greek kephalē "head" (see cephalo-) + pod-, stem of pous "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").

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snobbery (n.)
"the class of snobs," 1833, from snob + -ery. Meaning "snobbishness" is from 1843.
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plebe (n.)
also pleb, "member of the lowest class at a U.S. military academy," 1833, probably a shortened form of plebeian "one of the lower class," which in Latin also had the short form plebs or plebes.
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sort (n.)

late 14c., "group of people, animals, etc.; kind or variety of person or animal," from Old French sorte "class, kind," from Latin sortem (nominative sors) "lot; fate, destiny; share, portion; rank, category; sex, class, oracular response, prophecy," from PIE root *ser- (2) "to line up."

The sense evolution in Vulgar Latin is from "what is allotted to one by fate," to "fortune, condition," to "rank, class, order." Later (mid-15c.) "group, class, or category of items; kind or variety of thing; pattern, design." Out of sorts "not in usual good condition" is attested from 1620s, with literal sense of "out of stock."

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idiotype (n.)
"object typical of a class," 1865; see idio- "distinct" + type (n.). Related: Idiotypic.
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officialdom (n.)

"officials collectively or as a class," often disparaging, 1863, from official (n.) + -dom.

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kleptocracy (n.)
"rule by a class of thieves," 1819, originally in reference to Spain; see kleptomania + -cracy.
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oi (interj.)

1962, vulgar or working class pronunciation of hoy a call or shout to attract attention (compare ahoy).

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