Etymology
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carpology (n.)

"study of the structure of fruits," 1806; see carpo- (1) "fruit" + -logy.

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stratovolcano (n.)
coined in German (von Seebach, 1866), from strato- + volcano. So called for its layered structure.
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underclass (n.)
"subordinate social class," 1894, from under (adj.) + class (n.). A loan-translation of Swedish underklass.
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encroachment (n.)
mid-15c., "obtruding structure," from encroach + -ment, or an equivalent Old French compound.
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death-trap (n.)

"structure or situation involving imminent risk of death," 1835, from death + trap (n.).

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outclass (v.)

1870, originally in sports, "to beat (a rival) so completely as to put him out of the same class," from out- + class (n.).

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malformation (n.)

also mal-formation, "faulty formation, irregular or anomalous structure," 1731, from mal- + formation.

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classless (adj.)

1874 in the social sense, "having or belonging to no class," from class (n.) in the "social order" sense + -less. As "lacking the sophistication of high class," by 1979. Related: Classlessly; classlessness.

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anatomy (n.)
Origin and meaning of anatomy

late 14c., "study or knowledge of the structure and function of the human body" (learned by dissection); c. 1400, "anatomical structure," from Old French anatomie and directly from Late Latin anatomia, from late Greek anatomia for classical anatomē "dissection," literally "a cutting up," from ana "up" (see ana-) + temnein "to cut" (from PIE root *tem- "to cut").

"Dissection" (1540s), "mummy" (1580s), and "skeleton" (1590s) were primary senses of this word in Shakespeare's day; the meaning "the science of the structure of organized bodies" predominated from 17c. Of persons, "the body," from 1590s. Often misdivided as an atomy or a natomy (see N).

The scyence of the Nathomy is nedefull and necessarye to the Cyrurgyen [1541]
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structured (adj.)
1810, past-participle adjective from structure (v.). Meaning "organized so as to produce results" is from 1959.
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