Etymology
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double (adv.)

"twice, doubly," late 14c., from double (adj.). Double-dyed "twice dyed, deeply imbued," but usually figurative, "thorough, complete" is from 1660s. To see double "by illusion to see two images of the same object" is from 1650s.

To double check "check twice" is by 1958 (see check (v.1)). Related: Double-checked; double-checking. To double-space (v.) in typing is by 1905. Related: Double-spaced. To double book in reservations is by 1966. To double park "park (a vehicle) parallel to another on the side toward the street" is by 1917. Related: Double-parked; double-parking.

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exchequer (n.)

c. 1300, "a chessboard, checkerboard," from Anglo-French escheker "a chessboard," from Old French eschequier, from Medieval Latin scaccarium "chess board" (see check (n.1); also see checker (n.2)). The governmental sense of "department of the royal household concerned with the receipt, custody, and disbursement of revenue and with judicial determination of certain causes affecting crown revenues"  began under the Norman kings of England and refers to a cloth divided in squares that covered a table on which accounts of revenue were reckoned by using counters, and which reminded people of a chess board. Respelled with an -x- based on the mistaken belief that it originally was a Latin ex- word.

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chess (n.)

very ancient game of skill with 32 pieces, played by two on a checkered board of 64 squares, 13c., from Old French esches "chessmen," plural of eschec "game of chess, chessboard; checkmate" (see check (n.1)), from the key move of the game. Modern French distinguishes échec "check, blow, rebuff, defeat," from plural échecs "chess."

The original word for "chess" is Sanskrit chaturanga "four members of an army" — elephants, horses, chariots, foot soldiers. This is preserved in Spanish ajedrez, from Arabic (al) shat-ranj, from Persian chatrang, from the Sanskrit word.

The chess pieces are the block alphabet which shapes thoughts; and these thoughts, although making a visual design on the chessboard, express their beauty abstractly, like a poem. [Marcel Duchamp, address to New York State Chess Association, Aug. 30, 1952]
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repressive (adj.)

early 15c., in medicine, "serving to check or suppress, tending to subdue," from Old French repressif and directly from Medieval Latin repressivus, from Latin repress-, past-participle stem of reprimere "hold back, curb," figuratively "check, confine, restrain, refrain" (see repress). Related: Repressively.

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rebuff (v.)

"make blunt resistance to, put off with abrupt denial," 1580s, from obsolete French rebuffer "to check, snub," from Italian ribuffare "to check, chide, snide," from ribuffo "a snub," from ri- "back" (from Latin re-, see re-) + buffo "a puff," a word of imitative origin (compare buffoon, also buffet (n.2)). Related: Rebuffed; rebuffing.

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traveler (n.)

also traveller, late 14c., agent noun from travel (v.). Traveler's check is from 1891.

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controlled (adj.)

"held in check, restrained," 1580s, past-participle adjective from control (v.). Of rent, from 1930.

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credit-card (n.)

1952 in the modern sense; see credit (n.) + card (n.1). The phrase was used late 19c. to mean "traveler's check."

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rebuff (n.)

"a repelling; a check, a defeat; peremptory denial or refusal," 1610s, from rebuff (v.), or from French rebuffe or Italian ribuffo.

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cash (v.)

"convert (a check, etc.) to cash," 1811, from cash (n.). Encash (1865) also was sometimes used. Related: Cashed; cashing.

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