Etymology
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burn-out (n.)
also burnout, "drug user," by 1972, slang, from the verbal phrase, which is attested from 1590s in the sense "burn until fuel is exhausted;" see burn (v.) + out (adv.). The immediate source is perhaps the use of the phrase in reference to electrical circuits, "fuse or cease to function from overload" (1931). Also compare burnt out "extinct after entire consumption of fuel" (1837). Meaning "mental exhaustion from continuous effort" is from 1975.
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hang out (v.)
c. 1400, intransitive (as of the tongue, from the mouth); transitive use by 1560s; see hang (v.) + out (adv.). Colloquial meaning "to be found" is recorded from 1811, "in allusion to the custom of hanging out a sign or 'shingle' to indicate one's shop and business" [Century Dictionary]. As a noun (often hangout) "residence, lodging" attested from 1893; earlier "a feast" (1852, American English).
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get-out (n.)
also getout, figuratively indicating a high degree of something, by 1838, colloquial, from get (v.) + out (adv.). Verbal phrase get out as a command to go away is from 1711, but sense connection is not clear.
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carry-out (adj.)
of food and drink, "prepared to be consumed away from the place of sale," 1935, American English, from the verbal phrase, from carry (v.) + out (adv.). Compare takeaway, takeout, which have the same sense.
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go out (v.)
early 13c., "leave home," from go (v.) + out (adv.). Meaning "become extinct, expire" is from c. 1400.
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make out (v.)

c. 1600, "get along, succeed," from make (v.) + out (adv.). Sense of "obtain a clear understanding of" is from 1640s; that of "discern or discover visually" is by 1754; sense of "have sexual relations with" is attested by 1939.

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cut-out (n.)

also cutout, 1851, in reference to a kind of switch on a circuit to cut out an instrument, from the verbal phrase, from cut (v.) + out (adv.). The verbal phrase is attested from c. 1400 as "cut so as to take out;" from 1550s as "fashion or shape by cutting;" from 1736 as "remove, excise, omit." From 1640s as "be naturally formed or fashioned" (for some specified purpose).

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inside-out (adj.)

"with the in side being out," c. 1600, from inside (n.) + out (prep.). Reverse in form but identical in sense outside-in is attested by 1771.

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out-thrust (adj.)

"to extend or project outward," 1820, from out- + thrust (v.). Related: Out-thrusting.

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print-out (n.)

1899, "image reproduced by other means than chemical photographic development," from the verbal phrase print out (by 1884); see print (v.) + out (adv.). Meaning "sheet of printed matter produced by a computer or other automatic apparatus" is by 1953.

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