Etymology
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operetta (n.)

"a short opera, generally of a light character," 1770, opperata, from Italian operetta, diminutive of opera (see opera).

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profligacy (n.)

"shameless dissipation; the character or condition of being profligate," 1670s, from profligate + abstract noun suffix -cy.

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reliance (n.)

"act of relying; condition or character of being reliant," c. 1600; see rely (v.) + -ance.

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ethology (n.)

late 17c., "mimicry, art of depicting characters by mimic gestures," from Latin ethologia, from Greek ēthologia, from ēthos "character" (see ethos). Taken by Mill as "science of character formation" (1843); as a branch of zoology, "study of instincts," from 1897. Related: Ethological.

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punctuality (n.)

"exactness, the state or character of being punctual," 1610s; see punctual + -ity. Meaning "promptness" is from 1777.

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Jewishness (n.)
1540s, "Judaism" (as opposed to Christianity), from Jewish + -ness. From 1822 as "Jewish quality or character."
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John Bull 
"Englishman who exemplifies the coarse, burly form and bluff nature of the national character," 1772, from name of a character representing the English nation in Arbuthnot's satirical "History of John Bull" (1712). Via a slurred pronunciation of it comes jumble (n.), London West Indian and African slang word for "a white man," attested from 1957.
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Shylock (n.)
"usurer, merciless creditor," 1786, from Jewish money-lender character in Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice" (c. 1596).
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demeaning (adj.)

"lowering in character or repute," by 1848, present-participle adjective from demean (v.). Related: Demeaningly.

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pastoralism (n.)

"pastoral character, that which has or suggests idealized rural qualities," by 1809, from pastoral + -ism.

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