Etymology
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cephalization (n.)

"tendency of animal species to evolve so as to have important parts near the head," 1864, coined by U.S. zoologist and geologist James Dwight Dana (1813-1895) from Latinized form of Greek kephalē "head" (see cephalo-) on model of specialization, etc. Related: Cephalize.

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cephalopod (n.)

one of a class of mollusks notable for having tentacles attached to a distinct head, 1825, from French cephalopode, from Modern Latin Cephalopoda (the class name), from Greek kephalē "head" (see cephalo-) + pod-, stem of pous "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").

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cerebration (n.)

"exertion of the brain," whether conscious or unconscious, 1853, coined by English physiologist Dr. William B. Carpenter (1813-1885) from Latin cerebrum "brain" (see cerebral) + -ation. Related: Cerebrate (v.); cerebrated.

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certainly (adv.)

"without doubt or question, assuredly," c. 1300, from certain + -ly (2).

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certorari (n.)

"writ from superior to inferior courts seeking the records of a case," legal Latin, "to be certified, to be informed or shown," a word figuring in the opening phrase of such writs; passive present infinitive of certorare "to certify, inform," from certior, comparative of certus "sure" (see certain).

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cesarean 

alternative spelling of caesarian (see also æ (1)).

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cess (n.)

"tax, levy," 1530s, from the verb cess "impose a tax upon" (late 15c.), altered spelling of sess, short for assess (q.v.). 

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intra-cellular (adj.)

also intracellular, "existing or happening inside a cell," 1842; see intra- "within" + cellular.

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cerium (n.)

metallic element, first isolated in pure form in 1875, named for ceria, the name of the earth from which it was taken, which was discovered in 1803 and named by Berzelius and Hissinger for Ceres, the minor planet, "whose discovery (in 1801) was then one of the most striking facts in physical science" [OED]. The planet was named for the Roman goddess Ceres, from a root meaning "to grow." With metallic element ending -ium. Related: Ceric.

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celebratory (adj.)

"of or pertaining to celebration," 1855, from celebrate + -ory.

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