Etymology
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CEO (n.)

by 1984; abbreviation of chief executive officer.

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cephalization (n.)

"tendency of animal species to evolve so as to have important parts near the head," 1864, coined by U.S. zoologist and geologist James Dwight Dana (1813-1895) from Latinized form of Greek kephalē "head" (see cephalo-) on model of specialization, etc. Related: Cephalize.

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cephalopod (n.)

one of a class of mollusks notable for having tentacles attached to a distinct head, 1825, from French cephalopode, from Modern Latin Cephalopoda (the class name), from Greek kephalē "head" (see cephalo-) + pod-, stem of pous "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").

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cerebration (n.)

"exertion of the brain," whether conscious or unconscious, 1853, coined by English physiologist Dr. William B. Carpenter (1813-1885) from Latin cerebrum "brain" (see cerebral) + -ation. Related: Cerebrate (v.); cerebrated.

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certainly (adv.)

"without doubt or question, assuredly," c. 1300, from certain + -ly (2).

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certorari (n.)

"writ from superior to inferior courts seeking the records of a case," legal Latin, "to be certified, to be informed or shown," a word figuring in the opening phrase of such writs; passive present infinitive of certorare "to certify, inform," from certior, comparative of certus "sure" (see certain).

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cesarean 

alternative spelling of caesarian (see also æ (1)).

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cess (n.)

"tax, levy," 1530s, from the verb cess "impose a tax upon" (late 15c.), altered spelling of sess, short for assess (q.v.). 

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Celia 

fem. proper name, from Italian Celia, from Latin Caelia, fem. of Caelius, name of a Roman gens. Sheila is a variant.

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intra-cellular (adj.)

also intracellular, "existing or happening inside a cell," 1842; see intra- "within" + cellular.

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