Etymology
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out-thrust (adj.)

"to extend or project outward," 1820, from out- + thrust (v.). Related: Out-thrusting.

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print-out (n.)

1899, "image reproduced by other means than chemical photographic development," from the verbal phrase print out (by 1884); see print (v.) + out (adv.). Meaning "sheet of printed matter produced by a computer or other automatic apparatus" is by 1953.

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shake-out (n.)

also shakeout, "business or stock market upheaval," 1895, from verbal phrase; see shake (v.) + out (adv.). The verbal phrase is attested from c. 1200, earliest as "empty a container."

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phase-out (n.)

"gradual, planned removal or elimination," 1958, from the verbal phrase (1954; see phase (v.)).

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out-take (n.)

also outtake, "rejected part of a film," 1960, from out- + take (n.) in the movie sense. Related: Out-takes.

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turn-out (n.)

"audience, assemblage of persons who have come to see a show, spectacle, etc.," 1816, from the verbal phrase; see turn (v.) + out (adv.).

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far-out (adj.)

also far out, 1887, "remote, distant;" from adverbial phrase, from far (adv.) + out (adv.). Slang sense of "excellent, wonderful," is from 1954, originally in jazz talk.

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freak-out (n.)

also freakout "bad psychedelic drug trip," or something comparable to one, 1966, from verbal phrase freak out, attested from 1965 in the drug sense (from 1902 in a sense "change, distort, come out of alignment"); see freak (n.). There is a coincidental appearance of the phrase in "Fanny Hill:"

She had had her freak out, and had pretty plentifully drowned her curiosity in a glut of pleasure .... [Cleland, "Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure," 1749]

where the sense is "she had concluded her prank."

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time-out (n.)

also time out, 1896 in sports, 1939 in other occupations; from 1980 as the name of a strategy in child discipline; from time + out.

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fold-out (n.)

larger page, inserted folded, in a book, magazine, etc., 1961, from fold (v.) + out (adv.).

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