Etymology
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sist 
legal term, from Latin sistere "to cause to stand" (see assist (v.)).
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normalize (v.)

"reduce to a standard; cause to conform to a standard," 1848, from normal + -ize. Related: Normalized; normalizing.

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psychogenic (adj.)

"having a mental or psychological origin or cause," 1884, from psycho- + -genic.

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procure (v.)

c. 1300, "bring about, cause, effect," from Old French procurer "care for, be occupied with; bring about, cause; acquire, provide" (13c.) and directly from Late Latin procurare "manage, take care of;" from pro "in behalf of" (see pro-) + curare "care for" (see cure (v.)).

The main modern sense of "obtain; recruit" (late 14c.) is via the meaning "take pains to get or bring about" (mid-14c.). It had broader meanings in Middle English: to procure to slay was "cause to be slain;" procure to break, "cause to be broken," etc. The meaning "to obtain (women) for sexual gratification" of others is attested from c. 1600. Related: Procured; procuring.

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grudge (n.)
"ill will excited by some special cause," late 15c., from grudge (v.).
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confrontational (adj.)

"characterized by or likely to cause confrontation," 1969, from confrontation + -al (1). Related: Confrontationally.

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gratuitously (adv.)
1690s, "without cause or reason," from gratuitous + -ly (2). From 1716 as "without cost to the recipient."
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etiology (n.)
also aetiology, aitiology, "science of causes or causation," 1550s, from Late Latin aetiologia, from Greek aitiologia "statement of cause," from aitia "cause, responsibility" (from PIE *ai-t-ya-, from root *ai- (1) "to give, allot;" see diet (n.1)) + -logia "a speaking" (see -logy). Related: Etiologic; etiological.
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philhellene (adj.)

1824, "a friend of Greece, a foreigner who supports and assists the cause of the Greeks," from Greek philhellēn, from philos "loving" (see philo-) + Hellēnes "the Greeks" (compare Hellenic). Originally in English in reference to the cause of Greek independence; later also with reference to Greek literature or language. Related: Philhellenic; Philhellenism.

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Pollyanna (n.)

"one who finds cause for gladness in the most difficult situations," 1921, a reference to Pollyanna Whittier, child heroine of U.S. novelist Eleanor Hodgman Porter's "Pollyanna" (1913) and "Pollyanna Grows Up" (1915), who was noted for keeping her chin up and finding cause for happiness during disasters.

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