Etymology
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No results were found for cattie. Showing results for cattle.
cow-pox (n.)

also cowpox, disease of cattle, 1780, see cow (n.) + pox. The fluid of the vesicles can communicate it to humans, and getting it provides almost complete immunity to smallpox.

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cow-catcher (n.)

"strong frame in front of a locomotive for removing obstructions such as stray cattle," 1838, from cow (n.) + catcher.

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shorthorn (n.)

also short-horn, "one of a breed of cattle having very short horns," by 1847, from short (adj.) + horn (n.). Related: Short-horned.

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drover (n.)

"one who drives cattle or sheep to market," early 15c. (late 13c. as a surname), agent noun from drove (n.).

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sodbuster (n.)
"pioneer farmer in a cattle-grazing region," originally in the U.S. West, 1897, from sod (n.1) + agent noun from bust (v.).
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Euboea 
large island of Greece north of Attica and Boeotia, literally "rich in cattle," from eu- "good, well" (see eu-) + bous "ox, cow" (from PIE root *gwou- "ox, bull, cow"). Related: Euboean.
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loco-weed (n.)
plant of the U.S. West, noted for its effect on cattle and horses that ate it, 1877; see loco (adj.) "crazy" + weed (n.).
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corgi (n.)

"breed of short-legged dog originally bred in Wales for herding cattle," 1921, from Welsh corgi, from cor "dwarf" + ci "dog" (from PIE root *kwon- "dog").

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impound (v.)
early 15c., "to shut up in a pen or pound," from assimilated form of in- "into, in" (from PIE root *en "in") + pound (n.). Originally of cattle seized by law. Related: Impounded; impounding.
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rustler (n.)

1820, "one who or that which rustles" (a leaf, a bird), agent noun from rustle (v.). The American English meaning "cattle thief" is by 1882; earlier it meant "active, efficient person" (1872).

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