Etymology
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Casanova (n.)
"man of carnal adventures, connoisseur of seduction," 1888, from Giacomo Girolamo Casanova de Seignalt (1725-1798), the infamous debaucher. His name could be Englished as Jacob Jerome Newhouse, which sounds somewhat less romantic.
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maltreat (v.)

"to treat ill, abuse," 1708, from French maltraiter, or formed in English from mal- + treat (v.). Related: Maltreated; maltreating.

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mistreatment (n.)

"abuse, wrong or unkind treatment," 1716, from mistreat + -ment. The earlier noun was mistreating (mid-15c.).

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crone (n.)

late 14c., "a feeble and withered old woman," in Middle English a strong term of abuse, from Anglo-French carogne "carrion, carcass; an old ewe," also a term of abuse, from Old North French carogne, Old French charogne, term of abuse for a cantankerous or withered woman, also "old sheep," literally "carrion," from Vulgar Latin *caronia (see carrion).

Perhaps the "old ewe" sense is older than the "old woman" one in French, but the former is attested in English only from 16c. Since mid-20c. the word has been somewhat reclaimed in feminism and neo-paganism as a symbol of mature female wisdom and power.

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pillory (v.)

c. 1600, "punish by exposure in the pillory," from pillory (n.). Figurative sense of "expose publicly to ridicule, contempt, or abuse" is from 1690s. Related: Pilloried.

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kvetch (v.)
"to complain, whine," 1953 (implied in kvetching), from Yiddish kvetshn, literally "squeeze, press," from German quetsche "crusher, presser." As a noun, from 1936 as a term of abuse for a person.
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abuser (n.)
mid-15c., "one who uses (something) improperly," agent noun from abuse (v.). From c. 1600 as "a ravisher;" 1836 as "one who abuses in speech or words."
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stinker (n.)
as a term of abuse (often banteringly), c. 1600, agent noun from stink (v.); also in the same sense was stinkard (c. 1600). Extended form stinkeroo attested by 1934.
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bedevil (v.)
1768, "to treat diabolically, abuse," from be- + verbal use of devil (q.v.). Meaning "to mischievously confuse" is from 1755; that of "to drive frantic" is from 1823. Related: Bedeviled (1570s in a literal sense, "possessed"); bedeviling.
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unlawful (adj.)
"contrary to law, illegal," c. 1300, from un- (1) "not" + lawful. Unlawful assembly is recorded in statutes from late 15c. Related: Unlawfully. Old English had a noun unlagu ("unlaw") "illegal action, abuse of law."
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